The Clinton Presidency: First Appraisals

By Colin Campbell; Bert A. Rockman | Go to book overview

5
The Federal Executive under Clinton

JOEL D. ABERBACH

The second half of the twentieth century has been marked by a set of controversies about the nature and role of the executive branch in the United States. What should it do? How big should it be? Who should control it? How should it be staffed so that it can perform well?

Democrats built and staffed much of the contemporary administrative state during the New Deal and Great Society eras. The agencies and programs they created were identified as products of their party, providing a built-in basis, if assertive "conservative" Republicans ever came to power, for questioning not only the fundamental policies the agencies administered but the loyalty and role of their top career personnel as well. This indeed happened. The latter years of the Nixon administration and the eight years of the Reagan administration were particularly contentious, as Nixon sought to gain control of policy and administration in the face of a Democratic Congress, and Reagan, with the added advantage of a Republican Senate for six years of his presidency, sought to change the mission and shape of the executive branch.

The struggles between assertive Republican presidents and Democratic Congresses determined to thwart their influence exacerbated the normal rivalry between the branches built into our system of separate institutions, sharing powers. Congressional oversight of executive branch agencies increased noticeably in the late 1960s. It then took off in the early 1970s during a turbulent period of intense congressional conflict with the president and of internal reforms designed to increase Congress's capability to review and control the activities of the executive branch. 1

-163-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Clinton Presidency: First Appraisals
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 408

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.