Separate but Equal Branches: Congress and the Presidency

By Charles O. Jones | Go to book overview

7
Presidential Negotiating Styles with Congress

In his book The Vantage Point, Lyndon Johnson relates an important lesson taught to him by a Texas state senator, Alvin Wirtz. Senator Wirtz had arranged a meeting of private utility company owners, trying to persuade them to make electric power available to small farmers. Johnson got upset with one of the company presidents, "and in the course of our discussion I told the man that he could 'go to hell.'" Later Senator Wirtz called Johnson aside and said: "Listen, Lyndon, I've been around this business for a long time. . . . If I have learned anything at all in these years, it is this: You can tell a man to go to hell, but you can't make him go." That bit of advice was offered to Johnson in 1937. He never forgot it.

I thought of that story many times during my presidency. It seemed particularly apt when I found myself in a struggle with the House or the Senate. I would start to speak out, then I would think of Senator Wirtz and remember that no matter how many times I told the Congress to do something, I could never force it to act. 1

The Founding Fathers were determined that the president should not command Congress. Even the master congressional tactician, Lyndon Johnson, knew that success depended on his understanding the limits on the presidency. The two institutions have been described as being like "two gears, each whirling at its own rate of speed. It is not surprising that, on coming together, they often clash." 2

This chapter describes and analyzes this coming together of the president with Congress. Normally the relationship tends to be activated by the president because he wants something. He is forced to

-128-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Separate but Equal Branches: Congress and the Presidency
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 294

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.