The Neutrality Policy of the United States

By Julia E. Johnsen | Go to book overview

Americans with a realistic understanding of world conditions know that the neutrality policy being followed by the United States during the present war in Ethiopia is important mainly because of the precedents which will be set. Neither in present trade nor in the prospect of war orders is there much immediately involved; Ethiopia has not been and cannot be a customer, and the financier or trader who would give Italy credit would be a fit subject for a sanity examination. But it is America's peace two or five years hence that is at stake now. The real wars are coming--one in Europe when Nazi Germany decides that der Tag has come, and one in the Far East, as every dispatch from Japanese army headquarters in China reveals. The latter will furnish the supreme test for American neutrality. To insure that the bulwarks of neutrality will hold when these vital tests come, they must be made holeproof now and placed beyond the caprice of any man.


PROPAGANDA BALANCE SHEET8

A country abandons its neutrality because of basic compulsions of national interest, and propaganda is, after all, mainly the promotional expression of deep economic and spiritual drives. Yet, preceding and accompanying the sharp international crisis, it is the violent conflict of propaganda forces that decides the issue of peace or war. Modern wars can be fought only with the consent of an overwhelming majority of the population.

Among the actual and potential fomenters of war are the following: First, manufacturers of armaments and munitions. Under modern conditions of war, munitions include most of the products of agriculture and industry.

____________________
8
From article by O. W. Riegel, Professor of Journalism, Washington and Lee University. New Republic. 84:11-12. August 14, 1935.

-180-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Neutrality Policy of the United States
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 274

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.