The Neutrality Policy of the United States

By Julia E. Johnsen | Go to book overview

and that the nations are accustomed to sitting around it in a friendly discussion of their common problems.


NEUTRALITY AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION3

Underlying the problem of neutrality is, of course, the larger issue of the part that is to be played by organization in the relations of states. Few scholars today deny the need of some forms of organization to attain the desired goal of international peace. The question is rather whether the organization of the community of nations is to be content with accepting the law of 1914, strengthening its provisions for neutrality, and appealing to states in controversy to readjust their rights and settle their disputes between themselves; or whether, on the other hand, the organization of the community is to go further and seek to introduce new principles of the collective responsibility of all states for the protection of existing rights, and the collective duty of all to seek means of remedying present injustices and creating the underlying conditions of permanent peace.

That stability and justice are but two sides of the problem of peace is a common observation of jurists. Unless the existing order of things presents some degree of permanence, there can be no sense of security and no order in the relations between nation and nation more than between man and man. At the same time, unless the existing order is founded upon a reasonable approximation to justice, unless it expresses what the community as a whole feels is a fair and equitable adjustment of conflicting claims, it can not hope to maintain itself against disintegrating forces to which justice may make a stronger appeal than stability. It is the function of law

____________________
3
Charles G. Fenwick, Professor of Political Science, Bryn Mawr College. American Journal of International Law. 28:334-9. April, 1934.

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