The Neutrality Policy of the United States

By Julia E. Johnsen | Go to book overview

to remain aloof from disputes and conflicts with which we have no direct concern, but also to use our influence in any appropriate way to bring about the peaceful settlement of international differences. Our own interest and our duty as a great power forbid that we shall sit idly by and watch the development of hostilities with a feeling of self-sufficiency and complacency when by the use of our influence, short of becoming involved in the dispute itself, we might prevent or lessen the scourge of war. In short, our policy as a member of the community of nations should be twofold: first, to avoid being brought into a war, and second, to promote as far as possible the interests of international peace and good will. A virile policy tempered with prudent caution is necessary if we are to retain the respect of other nations and at the same time hold our position of influence for peace and international stability in the family of nations.

In summary, while our primary aim should be to avoid involvement in other people's difficulties and hence to lessen our chances of being drawn into a war, we should, on appropriate occasions and within reasonable bounds, use our influence toward the prevention of war and the miseries that attend and follow in its wake. For after all, if peace obtains, problems regarding neutrality will not arise.


ECONOMICS OF NEUTRALITY8

The essence of the neutrality adumbrated in Washington is self-sacrifice. Let there be no mistake about that. It should be envisaged by everybody in the current discussion.

The first economic profit that would have to be denied is the impetus to general demand created by special war demands. War brings customers to pro

____________________
8
From article by H. B. Elliston. Christian Science Monitor. Ag. 21, '35. p. 11.

-243-

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The Neutrality Policy of the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Introduction 3
  • Contents 5
  • Summary of the Arguments 9
  • Bibliography 39
  • Definitions 71
  • General Discussion 77
  • Historical Development of the Law Of Neutrality 77
  • Legal Position of Neutrality 82
  • Neutrality and War Prevention 85
  • Position of American Neutrality During the World War 89
  • Covenant of the League of Nations And Neutrality 94
  • Neutrality Policy of August 1935 104
  • American Policy 105
  • New Proposals 109
  • Price of Neutrality 118
  • Brief Excerpts 126
  • Affirmative Discussion 145
  • Neutral Policy for America 145
  • Mandatory Neutrality 152
  • Contraband and Neutral Trade 156
  • Future of Neutrality 162
  • Safeguards to Neutrality 167
  • Dragging America into War 174
  • American Neutrality 178
  • Propaganda Balance Sheet 180
  • Brief Excerpts 182
  • Negative Discussion 205
  • Cost of Peace 205
  • World Chaos Once More 213
  • Neutrality and International Organization 219
  • Is Neutrality Consistent With International Cooperation? 226
  • Neutrality and Neutral Rights Following the Pact Of Paris 231
  • Neutrality and War Prevention 238
  • Our Foreign Policy with Respect To Neutrality 241
  • Economics of Neutrality 243
  • Brief Excerpts 245
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