The Crescent and the Rising Sun: Indonesian Islam under the Japanese Occupation, 1942-1945

By Harry J. Benda | Go to book overview

Chapter Three
CHALLENGE AND RESPONSE: INDONESIAN ISLAM IN THE CLOSING YEARS OF DUTCH RULE

The drastic changes which the Indonesian social, religious and political scene had undergone in the brief span of a quarter- century rendered the tasks of colonial administration for more complex than they had been in the days of Snouck Hurgronje's Adviscrship in the Indies. The menacing, yet in essence rela­tively simple, problems posed by Muslim 'fanaticism' during the nineteenth century had given way to the bewildering issues posited by the rise of two entirely new Indonesian elite groups, one Western-influenced, the other Islamic-oriented. Both groups seemed to steer Indonesian developments away from the path envisioned by the originators of the Ethical Policy; both were impatiently clamoring for social if not political prominence at the expense of the traditional Indonesian elite, whose position had been profoundly eroded by the cumulative effects of Western economic forces and political control, and more recently by the Ethical Policy itself.

Indeed, the emergence of these new elites seemed to threaten the very foundation of Dutch colonial rule in the archipelago. The Java War, ulama-led village unrest, and even the Acheh War seemed to pale into insignificance compared to the turbulent upsurge of the Sarekat Iskm in the years during and immediately following the first world war, culminating in the explosive uprisings, under Communist leadership, which shook parts of Western Java and Western Sumatra in the mid-1920's.

Snouck Hurgronje's warning that, in the absence of a concerted Dutch policy of association, forces inimical to the Netherlands might make themselves masters of the colony's political destiny seemed to be borne out by these ominous happenings.

Though the revolts had taken the authorities by surprise, they

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Crescent and the Rising Sun: Indonesian Islam under the Japanese Occupation, 1942-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 322

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.