Innocent Abroad: Belgium at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919

By Sally Marks | Go to book overview

FOUR
THE STRUGGLE FOR REPARATIONS

THE DAMAGE DONE

Aside from territorial expansion and treaty revision, Belgium's chief concern at the peace conference was financial. Reparation for damage done, including immediate payments to make possible the reconstruction of a totally devastated economy, was so vital to Belgium that this issue nearly caused her to reject the Versailles treaty. From start to finish, the entire country and all three political parties were united in their insistence upon the urgency of their nation's needs. The battle over Belgian reparations claims was long and bitter and, as with so many other Belgian issues, her gains at Paris remained a bone of contention for many years thereafter.

The Belgian reparations claims were extraordinarily diverse, arising from her special legal position under the 1839 treaties, the extent and duration of the German occupation, and the total destruction of her economy. There were even claims against Austria, which, although a signatory of the 1839 treaties, had participated with Germany in the fighting in Belgium in mid-August of 1914 without declaring war until 28 August. Thus, Belgium claimed a variety of historic coins, armor, archives, and works of art removed by the Austrians during the wars of the French Revolution. Though Belgium was awarded these items by the Treaty of Saint-Germain, Austria succeeded on appeal in 1921 in retaining the two chief items, the treasure of the Order of the Golden Fleece and a Rubens triptych, on the argument that their removal had been a normal exercise of her eighteenth-century sovereignty over the area.1

There was no such complication about Belgian claims against Ger

____________________
1
Hymans to Clemenceau, 13 May 1919, van den Heuvel to Clemenceau, 20 May 1919, no. 569, BMAE DB / 7/II; FRUS PPC, 13:525-26.

-170-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Innocent Abroad: Belgium at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Abbreviations xvi
  • One - PRELUDE 5
  • THE BATTLE OF THE SEINE 103
  • Two - SEEKING A VOICE 105
  • Three - THE ANNEXATIONIST ATTEMPT 137
  • Four - THE STRUGGLE FOR REPARATIONS 170
  • Five - THE QUEST FOR LUXEMBURG 206
  • Six - THE SEARCH FOR SECURITY 255
  • Seven - THE SECONDARY SKIRMISHES 307
  • Eight - POSTLUDE 339
  • Index 445
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 464

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.