Ploughs and Politicks: Charles Read of New Jersey and His Notes on Agriculture, 1715-1774

By Carl Raymond Woodward | Go to book overview

One: The Man and His Times

A MAN of many affairs was Charles Read, and a dominant figure in pre-Revolutionary New Jersey. Scarcely an event of major importance transpired in the colony during his time in which he did not play some part. Born and bred in Philadelphia, schooled in London, trained in the British navy, and married in the West Indies, in 1739 he came to New Jersey to begin a career which in a unique way was identified with the pioneering activities of the colony. Merchant, planter, ironmaster, soldier, jurist, statesman, Charles Read was a man whose life throbbed to the gripping interplay of forces--social, economic, political, and military--which were forging a new nation. In and about his public services and his private enterprises is woven the history of New Jersey through the three decades which preceded the Revolution. In his life is dramatized the story of a commonwealth in the making.

This Charles Read was the third of a primogenitive line of five sires and sons, all bearing the identical name, which in three generations reached the heights of distinction, and in two more touched the depths of disgrace. His grandfather, Charles Read I, was a Quaker who at the age of twenty-eight left the ancestral estate Trevascon,1 in Cornwall; joining a group of emigrants to the New World, he arrived at Burlington about 1679, and subsequently settled in Philadelphia.2 His father, Charles II, had a mercantile business in Philadelphia, and was for a time mayor of the city. Charles III, the subject of this study, inherited his father's commercial tastes

____________________
1
Benjamin and Jane Harvey to Israel (?) Pemberton, Apr. 16, 1755. Clement Papers, Liber J, 28.
2
Samuel Smith, The History of the Colony of Nova Caeserea, or New Jersey ( 2nd ed., Trenton, 1877), p. 109. Although positive documentary proof is lacking, some records indicate that Charles Read I was a passenger on The Shield, which arrived at Burlington in December, 1678, the first ship to sail that far up the Delaware.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ploughs and Politicks: Charles Read of New Jersey and His Notes on Agriculture, 1715-1774
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 472

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.