Pangs of the Messiah: The Troubled Birth of the Jewish State

By Martin Sicker | Go to book overview

new Revisionist Party that presented a Herzl-style political Zionist program advocating that active measures be taken to secure British government support for a dramatic reassessment of the absorptive capacity of Palestine. His immediate goal was approval of an immigration level of 40,000 Jews a year for a twenty-five-year period. He called for the nationalization of all uncultivated lands and their subsequent lease to Jews, for purposes of colonization, on the payment of modest sums. He also insisted on the need for rapid industrialization of the country and the development and promotion of international trade, the latter requiring that the British government agree to the necessary promotional tariff policies. It was a far-reaching and dramatic program, a far cry from the gradualism and incrementalism that characterized official Zionist policy throughout Weizmann's tenure.

As expected, Weizmann's response to Jabotinsky's challenge was merely to reassert that the only viable course for the Zionist movement was the one that was being pursued by the Zionist Executive under his leadership. While Weizmann still prevailed in the final vote of confidence in his leadership, it was clear that the extent of his domination of the organization was shrinking. This was reflected in the fact that about half of the delegates to the Fourteenth Zionist Congress abstained from the vote on the confidence resolution.


NOTES
1
Encyclopedia of Zionism and Israel, p. 794.
2
Menachem Friedman, Society and Religion: The Non-Zionist Orthodox in Eretz-Israel 1918-1936, p. 147.
3
Moshe Burstein, Self-Government of the Jews in Palestine Since 1900, p. 87.
4
M. D. Gaon, Yehudei haMizrah beEretz Yisrael beAvar ubaHove, p. 136.
5
Burstein, Self-Government of the Jews in Palestine, pp. 100-101.
7
Friedman, Society and Religion, p. 175.
8
Burstein, Self-Government of the jews in Palestine, p. 160.
9
Ibid.
10
Sefer Toldot haHaganah, vol. II, pt. 1, p. 253.
11
Friedman, Society and Religion, p. 248.
12
M. Chigier, "The Rabbinical Courts in the State of Israel," Israel Law Review 2.2 ( 1967).
13
Zionist Organization, Reports of the Executive to the XIIth Zionist Congress, pp. 149-150.
14
Joseph B. Schechtman, Rebel and Statesman: The Early Years, pp. 418-419.

-70-

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Pangs of the Messiah: The Troubled Birth of the Jewish State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - British Military Government, 1918-1920 1
  • Notes 24
  • 2 - The Jewish High Comissioner 27
  • Notes 51
  • 3 - Internal Developments During the Samuel Regime 53
  • Notes 70
  • 4 - The Passfield White Paper 73
  • Notes 92
  • 5 - Prelude to Open Conflict 93
  • Notes 115
  • 6 - The Arab Revolt, 1936-1939 117
  • Notes 149
  • 7 - Palestine During World War II 151
  • Notes 176
  • 8 - The United Resistance 179
  • Notes 201
  • 9 - The United Nations Special Committee 203
  • Notes 222
  • 10 - The Troubled Birth of the Jewish State 223
  • Notes 240
  • Selected Bibliography 243
  • Index 253
  • About the Author *
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