Pangs of the Messiah: The Troubled Birth of the Jewish State

By Martin Sicker | Go to book overview

spot near the Tel Aviv zoo where each received eighteen lashes and was then released. The next morning, another Irgun warning was posted: "If the oppressors dare in the future to abuse the bodies and the human and national honour of Jewish youths, we shall no longer reply with the whip. We shall reply with fire." 23

The British attempt to humiliate the Jews had backfired. They were humiliated instead. The other Irgun prisoner was not whipped but granted amnesty instead, along with sixteen Arabs. Churchill, concerned about British prestige, accused the government of not knowing how to "behave like men. You whip a Jewish terrorist and the terrorists catch a British major and three non-commissioned officers and whip them the next day. You then cancel the whipping of another terrorist. Do you know what this means?" 24


NOTES
1
New York Times, March 18, 1944.
4
Manchester Guardian, April 24, 1944.
5
New York Herald-Tribune, February 4, 1945.
6
Michael J. Cohen, Palestine: Retreat from the Mandate, p. 160.
7
J. C. Hurewitz, The Struggle for Palestine, p. 228.
8
Palestine Post, September 28, 1945.
9
Hurewitz, The Struggle for Palestine, p. 232.
10
Palestine Post, November 29, 1945.
11
New York Times, January 26, 1946.
13
Hurewitz, The Struggle for Palestine, p. 256.
14
Thurston Clarke, By Blood and Fire, p. 108.
16
Harry Sacher, Israel. The Establishment of a State, pp. 62-63.
17
Palestine Post, July 24, 1946.
18
J. Bowyer Bell, Terror Out of Zion, p. 173.
19
Hurewitz, The Struggle for Palestine, p. 258.
20
Michael J. Cohen, "The Zionist Perspective", in William Roger Louis and Robert W. Stookey, eds., The End of the Palestine Mandate, p. 86.
21
New York Times, February 15, 1947.
22
Menachem Begin, The Revolt, p. 231.

-201-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pangs of the Messiah: The Troubled Birth of the Jewish State
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 261

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.