A Reference Companion to the History of Abnormal Psychology - Vol. 1

By John G. Howells; M. Livia Osborn | Go to book overview

C

CABANIS, PIERRE JEAN GEORGE (1757-1808). A French physician, revolutionary, and philosopher. Because he did not do well at school as a child, his father sent him to Paris, telling him to look after himself. He educated himself, studied medicine, and became the personal physician and friend of Hornoré Mirabeau (q.v.) a leader of the French Revolution. Cabanis became a member of the legislative Committee of Five Hundred. He was interested in psychological phenomena and believed in the existence of a whole personality as opposed to an organic predisposition. He studied consciousness and investigated whether or not the victims of the guillotine remained conscious after beheading. He concluded that they did not and that consciousness depends on the brain. His findings then were collected in a volume entitled Rapports du Physique et du Moral de l'Homme. ( 1802). He believed that every man had a right to work and was a passionate opponent of the death sentence. Cabanis supported materialism and, because of his views, is considered the founder of physiological psychology.

Bibliography: Ackerknecht E. H. 1966. Medicine in the Paris hospital 1794-1848.

CACODEMONOMANIA. A term coined by Jean Esquirol (q.v.) to indicate that class of insane who believe that they are in communication with God, who inspires them to preach and convert mankind.

Bibliography: Esquirol J. E. D. 1845. Reprint. 1965. Mental maladies: a treatise on insanity.

CADIVA INSANIA. An obsolete Latin term for epilepsy (q.v.), literally meaning "falling insanity."

CADUCA PASSIO or CADUCUS MORBUS. An obsolete Latin term for epilepsy (q.v.), meaning "falling disease."

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