A Reference Companion to the History of Abnormal Psychology - Vol. 1

By John G. Howells; M. Livia Osborn | Go to book overview

I

IAGO. A character in the play Othello by William Shakespeare (q.v.). He is a psychopath, who is completely selfish and has no use for "love and duty." In the original Italian source, Iago killed Desdemona with a stocking filled with sand.

Bibliography: Orgel S. 1968. Iago Am. Imago. 25:258-73.

IBSEN, HENRIK (1828-1906). A Norwegian dramatist and poet. The family was reduced to near poverty when his parents lost their wealth in a business venture. At the age of sixteen, he was apprenticed to an apothecary, as he could not afford to study medicine. The frustration and unhappiness of these early years never left him and are reflected in his dramas, which often include doctors ministering to sick minds. He possessed a penetrating insight into the psychological conflicts found within the family and within society. His plays, dealing with such social issues as marriage, corruption, venereal disease, government, man's delusions of superiority, and mental disorders, caused the critics to assert that they were studies in insanity best fitted for the lecture room in Bedlam (q.v.). Among his works are the verse dramas Brand ( 1866) and Peer Gynt ( 1867) and the plays A Doll's House ( 1879), Ghosts ( 1881), Rosmersholm ( 1886), The Lady from the Sea ( 1888), Hedda Gabler ( 1890), and The Master Builder ( 1892). Insanity and its causes are recurrent themes throughout them. A series of severe strokes toward the end of his life so destroyed his memory, that he could not even remember the alphabet.

Bibliography: Meyer M. 1974. Ibsen.

ID. A term first used by Georg Groddeck (q.v.). Sigmund Freud (q.v.) borrowed it from him and used it to indicate that part of the personality that is inherited and unconscious.

Bibliography: Freud S. 1923. The ego and the id.

IDEAL AND NOTIONAL INSANITY.SeeINSANITY, IDEAL AND NOTIONAL.

-456-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Reference Companion to the History of Abnormal Psychology - Vol. 1
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 576

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.