Self-Management Strategies: Theory, Curriculum, and Teaching Procedures

By Michael B. Medland | Go to book overview

9
FORMULATING AND USING EXAMPLE SETS

To teach the individual discriminations and operations that make up the SM system strategies, another powerful teaching tool is needed. That tool is the example set. It brings together a group of examples to teach the discrimination or operation of interest. This chapter illustrates how to go about designing and teaching SM behavior with example sets.

The design and use of example sets is not difficult--they are essentially a modification of the way statements and questions are used. Moreover, their use saves an immense amount of teaching time and makes it possible to teach a wide range of sophisticated discriminations and operations even to very young students.


THE DEFINITION AND FUNCTION OF EXAMPLE SETS

There are two inclusive classes of examples. Modeled examples are instances of a complete or fragmentary contingency (condition, behavior, consequence). A modeled example illustrates a condition-behavior match or nonmatch that may or may not include a consequence. When a match is presented, it is called a positive modeled example; when a nonmatch is presented, it is called a negative modeled example. The function of modeled examples is to set the occasion for student learning or change. Usually a modeled example is simply called a model, positive or negative.

The second inclusive class, test examples, function to set the occasion for a demonstration of learning. Test examples are the conditions component of the modeled examples. If a condition is matching, relative to the class of

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Self-Management Strategies: Theory, Curriculum, and Teaching Procedures
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 296

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.