Self-Management Strategies: Theory, Curriculum, and Teaching Procedures

By Michael B. Medland | Go to book overview

11
CORRECTING BEHAVIOR

Students make mistakes. To combat them, correction procedures are needed. Similar to the special activities identified in Chapter 4, corrections are short, positive events sandwiched into ongoing instruction. They represent a revision of your instruction. By correcting mistakes before they become chronic, you make instruction more positive and insure that the learner has the needed skills to continue successfully.

The correction procedures presented here assume that the students are complying with your instruction and that the error is not an outright conflict between individuals. Chapters 3 and 18 illustrate the elements and use of an intervention system to deal with such conflicts. The objective of this chapter is to insure that specific student errors related to the discriminations, operations, and strategies of the SM curriculum can be corrected.


THE ANALYSIS OF CORRECTION PROCEDURES

The Function of Correction Procedures

Correction procedures establish the desired condition-behavior match when the main body of the instructional program has failed to do so. They are designed to stop or quickly follow nonmatching behavior, establish conditions for matching behavior, and reinforce the ensuing correct behavior. To explain this complex activity, all eight principles of behavior and technology presented in Chapter 1 are involved.

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