Citizens, Political Communication, and Interest Groups: Environmental Organizations in Canada and the United States

By John C. Pierce; Mary Ann E. Steger et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter Three
Trust in Sources of Policy-Relevant Information

As noted in the previous chapters, Canada and the United States are both postindustrial democracies, they share a common adoption of federal governmental forms, and the two nations share a common legal- political legacy. Even so, the two neighboring nations are widely assumed to have distinct political cultures and maintain quite dissimilar governmental practices and institutional structures. It is one thesis of this book that the way in which interest groups operate as sources of political influence and producers and distributors of policy-relevant information may differ in Canada and the United States in ways reflecting these cultural and structural differences.

As Chapter 2 describes, a number of studies comparing the political cultures of Canada and the United States note significant differences in political beliefs and values (see Gibbins and Nevitte 1985; Horowitz 1966; Lipset 1985). By way of review, Canadian political culture is thought to be more organic and collectivist in nature than is American political culture ( Lipset 1963; Lipset 1985). American political culture reflects a Lockean individualistic conception of society ( Commager 1950, 1977; Hartz 1955; Kluegel and Smith 1986), and public policy in the United States is shaped by pervasive, widely held political values that stress the free enterprise system, individualism, and respect for property rights ( Dolbeare and Medcalf 1988; McCloskey and Zaller 1984). Americans, consequently, can be shown to be more insistent on claiming their self-perceived rights--either from government or from other citizens in the form of civil litigation ( Hargrove 1967; Kritzer et al. 1990).

The Canadian policy-making system has been characterized as being

-69-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Citizens, Political Communication, and Interest Groups: Environmental Organizations in Canada and the United States
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.