Citizens, Political Communication, and Interest Groups: Environmental Organizations in Canada and the United States

By John C. Pierce; Mary Ann E. Steger et al. | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
The question used was: "What is your highest level of education?" The following response categories were provided: (1) never attended school; (2) some grade school; (3) completed grade school; (4) some high school; (5) completed high school; (6) some college; (7) completed college; (8) some graduate work; and (9) an advanced degree.
2.
To indicate support for the NEP, respondents were asked to indicate agreement or disagreement on these six items: (1) the balance of nature is very delicate and easily upset by human activities; (2) the earth is like a spaceship with only limited room and resources; (3) plants and animals do not exist primarily for human usage; (4) modifying the environment for human use seldom causes serious problems; (5) there are no limits to growth for nations like the United States and Canada; (6) humankind was created to rule over the rest of nature. Five response categories were provided, ranging from "strongly agree" to "strongly disagree." After recoding, the scores on all six items were summed for the additive NEP scale.
3.
The question used to ascertain subjective political ideology was: "How would you place yourself on the following ideological scale in your country?" The Likert response format for the United States was (1) very liberal, (2) liberal, (3) moderate, (4) conservative, (5) very conservative; for Canada, the format was (1) very left, (2) left, (3) moderate, (4) right, (5) very right.
4.
The question used to construct Inglehart ( 1990) postmaterial scale was: "There is a lot of talk these days about what your country's goals should be for the next ten to fifteen years. Listed below are some of the goals that different people say should be given top priority. Would you please mark the one goal you consider the most important in the long run? What would be your second choice? Please mark that second choice as well." The response categories provided were (1) maintaining order in the nation, (2) giving people more say in important governmental decisions, (3) fighting rising prices, (4) protecting freedom of speech. Respondents are considered to profess postmaterialist value orientations (i.e., Maslow's higher-order values) if they selected both the (2) and (4) postmaterialist responses. If the respondent selected items (1) and (3), they are considered to have materialist value orientations (i.e., lower-order values), and any other combination is considered a mixed orientation.
5.
The pseudo-R2 measure has been recommended by Aldrich and Nelson ( 1984, p. 57) as an acceptable substitute for logit models to replace the conventional R2 used in regression models.

-94-

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