Segregation in Federally Subsidized Low-Income Housing in the United States

By Modibo Coulibaly; Rodney D. Green et al. | Go to book overview

1
Introduction

There have been many studies on the effects of segregation and economic inequality on education, income, wealth, social services, and housing in the United States. Such studies often assume, implicitly or explicitly, that segregation is a manifestation of generalized white prejudice resulting in discrimination against racial minorities, often mediated through an imperfect market mechanism. Following the passage of the Civil Rights Act in 1964, and the Fair Housing Act in 1968, it was widely believed that the new federal legislation would not only significantly remedy the inequalities resulting from this process by reducing segregation and stemming racial discrimination but also narrow the socioeconomic gap between racial groups. Fair housing would ultimately "turn this nation toward the creation of a slum-free, ghetto-free America [and] affect the whole pattern of urban housing and community life and actually lead to the establishment of fair housing throughout the United States." 1

Some thirty years after these civil rights and fair housing initiatives, however, segregation continues to be a serious social and political challenge in most American cities. The failure of these initiatives is often attributed to the federal government's accommodation of local practices with regard to race relations or to a weak judicial and administrative enforcement of the Fair Housing Act. This study argues instead that segregation by race and income

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Segregation in Federally Subsidized Low-Income Housing in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 3
  • 2 - Housing, History, and Schools of Thought 5
  • Summary of the Post-Civil Rights Literature 17
  • Notes 18
  • 3 - Development of Low-Income Housing in the United States 23
  • Summary 35
  • Notes 36
  • 4 - Research Procedure 43
  • Summary 58
  • Notes 59
  • 5 - Patterns of Segregation in Low-Income Housing, 1932-1963 63
  • Conclusion About the PWA 69
  • Conclusions About the USHA 80
  • Conclusions About War Housing 86
  • Summary: Patterns of Segregation in the Early Period 92
  • Notes 94
  • 6 - Patterns of Racial Segregation and Economic Isolation, 1964-1992 101
  • Summary 117
  • Notes 119
  • 7 - Trends in Subsidized Housing Segregation 123
  • Summary 129
  • Notes 130
  • 8 - Summary and Conclusion 131
  • Appendix 135
  • Note 137
  • Selected Bibliography 139
  • Index 151
  • ABOUT THE AUTHORS 155
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