Segregation in Federally Subsidized Low-Income Housing in the United States

By Modibo Coulibaly; Rodney D. Green et al. | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Social problems, according to Arnold Rose, are situations that affect "a large number of people and when there is a consensus that there is a problem and that something can be done to alleviate it." Arnold M. Rose, "Theory for the Study of Social Problems," Social Problems 4, 3 ( 1957): 190; see also International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, 1972 ed., s.v. "Social Problem."
2.
"The treatment of black Americans," wrote Thomas Pettigrew, "has been a national issue since our beginning; it has been persistently our key domestic issue of conflict; and it has shaped and contorted much of our social structure." Thomas F. Pettigrew , "Racial Change and Social Policy," The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences 441 ( 1979): 115.
3.
John Hope Franklin, "The Two Worlds of Race: A Historical View," in The Negro American, edited and with an introduction by Talcott Parsons and Kenneth B. Clark ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1966). 53.
4.
According to a white UMW member, "as far as we are concerned as miners, the colored men are with us in the mines. They work side by side with us. They are members of our organization; can receive as much consideration from the officials of the organization as any other members, no matter what color. We treat them that way. . . . There is only one particular objection, and that is they are used to a great extent in being taken from one place to another to break a strike:" W. E. B. Du Bois, "The Negro Artisan," Report of a Social Study made under the Direction of Atlanta University; Together with the Proceedings of the Seventh Conference for the Study of the Negro Problems, Held at Atlanta University, May 27, 1902, ed. W. E. B. Du Bois, ( Atlanta: Atlanta University Press, 1902), 161.
5.
Sumner Eliot, "The Labor Movement and the Negro During Reconstruction," Journal of Negro History 33, 4 ( 1948): 429-430; see also Charles S. Johnson, "Some Aspects of Negro Migration," Opportunity ( October 1927): 297-299.
6.
For a discussion, see Charles H. Wesley, Negro Labor in the United States 1850-1925 ( New York: Vanguard, 1927); Eliot, "The Labor Movement and the Negro,"426-468 passim; Daphne Spain, "Race Relations and Residential Segregation in New Orleans: Two Centuries of Paradox," The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences 441 ( 1979): 82-96.
7.
Gerald N. Grob, "Organized Labor and the Negro Worker, 1865-1900," Labor History 1, 2 ( 1960): 164.
8.
"In looking for an explanation of the antipathy which one race feels toward another, we may first of all inquire whether there are any conditions arising in the course of the biological development of a species which, aside from social activities, leads to a predilection for those of one's own kind and a prejudice against organically different groups. And we do, in fact, find such conditions." William L. Thomas, "The Psychology of Race Prejudice," American Journal of Sociology 9 ( 1904): 593.
9.
See, for example, Robert Parks, "The Bases of Race Prejudice," The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences 140 ( 1928): 11-20.
11.
Ibid.
12.
For a critique of similar psychological explanations of race relations, see Ira Katznelson , City Trenches: Urban Politics and the Patterning of Class in the United States ( New York: Pantheon, 1981).

-18-

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Segregation in Federally Subsidized Low-Income Housing in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 3
  • 2 - Housing, History, and Schools of Thought 5
  • Summary of the Post-Civil Rights Literature 17
  • Notes 18
  • 3 - Development of Low-Income Housing in the United States 23
  • Summary 35
  • Notes 36
  • 4 - Research Procedure 43
  • Summary 58
  • Notes 59
  • 5 - Patterns of Segregation in Low-Income Housing, 1932-1963 63
  • Conclusion About the PWA 69
  • Conclusions About the USHA 80
  • Conclusions About War Housing 86
  • Summary: Patterns of Segregation in the Early Period 92
  • Notes 94
  • 6 - Patterns of Racial Segregation and Economic Isolation, 1964-1992 101
  • Summary 117
  • Notes 119
  • 7 - Trends in Subsidized Housing Segregation 123
  • Summary 129
  • Notes 130
  • 8 - Summary and Conclusion 131
  • Appendix 135
  • Note 137
  • Selected Bibliography 139
  • Index 151
  • ABOUT THE AUTHORS 155
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