Policing a Socialist Society: The German Democratic Republic

By Nancy Travis Wolfe | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

First and foremost I am deeply indebted for the invaluable assistance of Prof. Dr. Erich Buchholz of the Humboldt University in East Berlin in carrying out my research in the GDR since 1984; he was unfailingly responsive, and his patient explanations as well as his extensive practical aid in making contacts and arrangements for me facilitated comprehension of the GDR criminal justice system.

Many members of university faculties and academies in the GDR were supportive and informative. In particular, I would like to thank Prof. Dr. Horst Luther ( Humboldt University), Prof. Dr. Günther Kräupl ( Jena University), Dr. Hans-Dietrich Lehmann ( Humboldt University, Supreme Court), Prof. Dr. Rolf Uhlmann ( Humboldt University), Dr. Bernd Löwe ( Academy of Sciences of the GDR, Humboldt University), and Dr. Frohmut Müller ( Academy for Political Science and Jurisprudence). Without the willingness of members of the police to share their knowledge with me, I could not have completed the research. Special thanks are due to Oberrat Wolfgang Degenhardt of the Public Relations Department of the police presidency in Berlin, and to Dr. Ernst-Dieter Erdmann and his colleagues who had responsibility for the process of dissolution of the MfS in the district of Berlin for providing extensive information and material concerning the operation of the Ministry for State Security.

Understanding of the GDR was enhanced as well by conversations with scholars in the FRG who have for decades studied its legal and political systems. Especially helpful were Professor Dr. Hartmut Zimmermann ( Free University of Berlin) and Professor Dr. Friedrich-Christian Schroeder ( University of Regensburg).

I would like to express my appreciation of the consistent encouragement of the dean of the College of Criminal Justice, Dr. Willian J. Mathias, and to the other members of the faculty of the college and the students whose interest and questions provided stimulation.

-xvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Policing a Socialist Society: The German Democratic Republic
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Notes xvi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Abbreviations xix
  • Part I 1
  • Chapter 1 Introduction 3
  • Chapter 2 The German People's Police 23
  • Chapter 3 The Ministry for State Security 60
  • Chapter 4 The End of an Era 88
  • Part II 101
  • Chapter 5 The Gentle Revolution 103
  • Chapter 6 Slaying the Dragon 123
  • Chapter 7 Reorienting the People's Police 169
  • Chapter 8 The Dissolution of the GDR 211
  • References 229
  • Index 241
  • About the Author 244
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.