Preparing to Teach Writing: Research, Theory, and Practice

By James D. Williams | Go to book overview

the chapters, but those dealing with reading and writing, psychology and language, and ESL and nonmainstream students are almost completely new because so much has changed in these areas over the years. More important, perhaps, is that I tried to make this second edition more open-ended, allowing more room for readers to strike out on their own after seeing what the various experts have to say.

This open-ended approach puts the second edition even more at odds with those who are looking for a cookbook that will guide them through the frightful first year or two in the classroom. However, as I noted in the past, such a cookbook does not exist. Even so, students in my classes and those who have read the first edition frequently ask me to tell them what they should consider to be the most important factor in becoming a good teacher. Over the last several years, the answer has become clearer to me, although I am not sure I communicate it convincingly to those who ask: They need to love children and know that teaching is a caring profession.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I owe much to my students who, over the years, have taught me new things, and I thank them. Thanks go to Naomi Silverman at Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, the best editor I have had on any project. I also thank the many colleagues around the country who used the first edition and who were kind enough to send me notes detailing their successes and failures with the book. This information has been invaluable. I would like to thank the many great teachers I had in school, especially Lou Waters, Hans Guth, and the late Phil Cook, all of San Jose State University, and Ross Winterowd, Jack Hawkins, and Steve Krashen of the University of Southern California. A special thanks goes to Erika Lindemann for being my colleague, mentor, and friend at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Finally, thanks to my wife, Ako, for everything: Anata-wa boku-no taiyo desu.

-- James D. Williams

-xiv-

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Preparing to Teach Writing: Research, Theory, and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xiv
  • 1 - Rhetoric and Writing 1
  • 2 - Models for Teaching Writing 45
  • 3 - The Classroom as Workshop 79
  • 4 - Reading and Writing 99
  • 5 - Grammar and Writing Overview 118
  • 6 - Style 160
  • 7 - English as a Second Language and Nonstandard English 176
  • 8 - The Psychology of Writing 219
  • 9 - Writing Assignments 242
  • 10 - Assessing Writing 258
  • Appendix A - Writing Myths 296
  • Conclusion 303
  • Appendix B - Sample Essays 305
  • References 313
  • Author Index 331
  • Subject Index 337
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