Cognitive and Instructional Processes in History and the Social Sciences

By Mario Carretero; James F. Voss | Go to book overview

teachers using questionable methods may hinder students from learning history.

I believe that what I have distilled from the chapters of this section, and the complementary information I have added, is sufficient to illustrate the importance of the task we are facing. Changes in the curriculum should be afforded, programs of teacher training should be designed, and instructional means and resources should be mobilized to meet all these needs. But it is not only a matter of institutional change. Researchers and teachers can do something by themselves, as they would find the effort worthwhile and the potential results very rewarding. The chapters of this section are good examples of the fact that it is possible to clarify our educational goals and to improve the quality of our methods in teaching history. What is at stake is the students' learning of a subject that can be really considered as formative. A subject that helps them to make sense of their past and that, in doing so, provides a multiperspectivistic view to understand the present.


REFERENCES

Bauer P. J., & Mandler J. ( 1989). "One thing follows another: Effects of temporal structure on 1- to 2-year-olds' recall of events". Developmental Psychology, 25, 197-206.

Britton B. K., & Black J. B. ( 1985). Understanding expository texts. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Bruner J. ( 1986). Actual minds, possible worlds. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Bruner J. ( 1990). Acts of meaning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Burke K. ( 1945). A grammar of motives. New York: Prentice-Hall.

Correa N., & Rodrigo M. J. ( 1992, September). Beliefs about ecology and the effects of self-other perspective in a verification task. Paper presented at the Vth European Conference on Developmental Psychology. Seville, Spain.

Gallie W. B. ( 1964). Philosophy and historical understanding. New York: Schocken Books.

Gernsbacher M. A., Goldsmith H. H., & Robertson R. R. S. ( 1992). "Do readers mentally represent characters' emotional states?" Cognition and Emotion, 6, 89-111.

Hempel C. ( 1962). Explanation in science and in history. In R. G. Colodny (Ed.), Frontiers of science and philosophy (pp. 7-33). Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.

Kuhn D., Amsel E., & O'Loughlin M. ( 1988). The development of scientific thinking skills. New York: Academic Press.

Morrow D. G., Greenspan S. L., & Bower G. H. ( 1987). "Accessibility and situation models in narrative comprehension". Journal of Memory and Language, 26, 165-187.

Porter D. ( 1981). The emergence of the past: a theory of historical explanation. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Rodrigo M. J., Rodriguez A., & Marrero J, ( 1993). Las teorías implícitas: Una aproximación al conocimiento cotidiano. Madrid: Visor.

Rodrigo M. J., & Triana B. ( 1993, July). Parental beliefs about child development and parental inferences about actions during child-rearing episodes. Paper presented at the Symposium on Social Representations. III European Congress of Psychology. Tampere, Finland.

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