Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

By R. C. Terry | Go to book overview

B

Babington House, Suffolk country home of the Babingtons where hunting, sports, and games predominate. Young John Caldigate is made to feel welcome as a youth after his mother's death and his father's coolness make his own home less inviting. Aunt Polly forces John into an engagement with Julia Babington in the linen closet here. JC SRB

Babington, Humphrey, genial, good-hearted country squire and uncle of John Caldigate, considered stupid by John's father. The hospitality of his family and their sporting life make the young John feel at home when he quarrels with his father; later, the squire defends John against family animosity during the bigamy trial. JC SRB

Babington, John, son and heir of Humphrey Babington, who remains on good terms with John Caldigate despite the hatred of his mother and sister for his friend. JC SRB

Babington, Julia, cherry-cheeked country girl, intended by her mother to marry John Caldigate. When he deserts her, she feels scorned and speaks ill of him. She marries the Revd Augustus Smirkie who, with her, is piously grateful that she has been delivered from Caldigate's charge of bigamy. JC SRB

Babington, Maryanne(Aunt Polly), John Caldigate's loving aunt who tries to force a marriage between him and her daughter Julia. When John sneaks out of the engagement by running away to Australia, she and Julia hold a longstanding grudge against him, relieved only after Julia becomes Mrs Smirkie and John is vindicated after his trial for bigamy. JC SRB

Baden-Baden, famed German spa where Countess De Courcy flees her abusive husband, taking along her daughters Lady Margaretta and Lady Alexandrina Crosbie who has tired of her husband. SHA NCS

Bagehot, Walter ( 1826-77), editor of The Economist ( 1860-77), authority on banking and finance, better known as essayist in a wide sphere. A lucid and engaging stylist; from 1855 as editor of the National Review he strongly influenced political thinking and developments in social science. The first part of Bagehot English Constitution ran in Fortnightly Review, May 1865, the periodical Trollope helped found. RCT

Baggett, Mrs, domestic in the employ of the Whittlestaff family for most of her life. Nde Dorothy Tedcaster, she marries Sergeant Baggett but lives apart from him as the housekeeper at Croker's Hall. Devoted and deferential to her bachelor employer, Mr Whittlestaff, she also assumes the familiarity of an equal. OML RC

Baggett, Sergeant Timothy, ex-military man whose most distinctive features are a wooden leg and a red nose. An unemployed and unemployable alcoholic living in Portsmouth, he periodically visits his wife, housekeeper at Croker's Hall, to beg for money and demand her return. OML

RC

Bagwax, Samuel, delightful postal clerk whose detective work with postage marks and stamps proves conclusively that John Caldigate's conviction for bigamy was wrong. He heroically sacrifices an official trip to Australia in order to release Caldigate from prison, and then is rewarded with the same trip for his honourable behaviour. JC SRB

Bailey, Catherine, former fiancee of Mr Whittlestaff. She jilts him for an Old Bailey barrister named Mr Compas. A 'fair-haired girl' of joyous good spirits, she 'blossomed out into the anxious mother of ten fair-haired children' (II). OML

RC

Baillie, Joanna ( 1762-1851), Scottish dramatist and poet, issued four volumes of Plays on the Passions ( 1798- 1836). Her most successful play, The Family Legend, was produced at Drury Lane in 1810 with a prologue by Sir Walter Scott. In his Commonplace Book, Trollope projected a critical account of the 'Excellencies and defects of the modern English' drama as displayed in selected works of five contemporary dramatists. Joanna Baillie's Henriquez, published in the three- volume collection Dramas ( 1836), was included, along with plays by Fanny Kemble, Sheridan

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 634

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.