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Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

By R. C. Terry | Go to book overview

C

Cairo, a favourite tourist destination, 'delightfully mysterious' city from which the group sets out to see the Pyramids. Also in The Bertrams, and where George Walker is sent for his sore throat. 'Pyramids', "'Walker'" TAC1, 2 GRH

Caldigate, Daniel. Country squire at Folking, he is the undemonstrative but loving father of John, who buys his son's right of inheritance when they quarrel over John's debts. The two are reconciled when John proves his steadiness and maturity. Old Caldigate becomes an affectionate father to his daughter-in-law Hester and a great support to her during John's bigamy trial. JC SRB

Caldigate, Daniel John, infant son of John and Hester who becomes temporarily 'nameless' while his legitimacy is questioned during his father's trial for bigamy. JC SRB

Caldigate, George, nephew of Daniel, briefly considered as heir after John sold his right of inheritance. JC SRB

Caldigate, John, eponymous hero, reckless and impulsive when young but maturing to become a settled country squire at Folking, Cambridgeshire. He quarrels with his father over gambling debts, sells his inheritance, and travels to Australia where he makes his fortune in gold. Flirtatious and naive, he is taken in by the dubious Euphemia Smith, with whom he lives for some years. Returning to England, he marries Hester Bolton despite resistance from her stern mother. His happy marriage is jeopardized when Euphemia Smith and former mining partner Timothy Crinkett charge him with bigamy. Largely because of Caldigate's misguided attempt at restitution, he is convicted and briefly imprisoned, but later pardoned. JC SRB

Callander, Mrs. A fellow passenger on board the ship which takes John Caldigate to Australia, she warns him about Euphemia Smith. Caldigate later regrets that he did not listen to her. JC SRB

Calvert, Marie. Inwardly loyal to her lover Adolphe Bauche, she marries the elderly Campan but commits suicide by leaping from rocks near the grotto where Adolphe forsook her. "'Bauche'" TAC1 GRH

Cambridgeshire, setting for much of John Caldigate and the location of Folking, Utterden, Chesterton, and Puritan Grange. The land is flat, unattractive, and bisected by dikes. John Caldigate's trial is held here and his father expects the Cambridgeshire jury to be prejudiced, easily led, and rather stupid. JC SRB

Cambridge University. Trollope's brother Henry gained a sizarship to Caius College ( 1830) but lasted there only a year because of the family's lack of money. Some fifteen of Trollope's fictional characters are Cambridge men, among them Frank Gresham ( DT) and Gerald Palliser ( DC). The most distinguished is Harry Clavering, a fellow of his college who played cricket for the Cambridge eleven and rowed in one of Trinity's boats ( C). Charles Amedroz ( BE) was sent down from Trinity. Dick Shand was obviously going wrong because he despised the University and left without a degree ( JC). Cambridge's most despicable students were Obadiah Slope ( BT), Louis Scatcherd, whose three terms failed to make him a gentleman ( DT), and Augustus Scarborough, who was cordially disliked by everyone ( MSF). RCT

Cameron, Julia Margaret (née Pattle) 1815-79), born in Calcutta, married Charles Hay Cameron, jurist and member of the Supreme Council of India. With six children of her own and several adopted, she made her home a salon of art and letters. She took up photography when her daughter gave her camera equipment in 1863, and within a few months she was acclaimed for her portraits. She photographed Darwin, Tennyson, and Browning. In October 1864, she met the Trollopes while they were en route to Sir William *Pollock's house in the Isle of Wight, where the Camerons also lived. During the Trollopes' five- day stay on the island, Cameron secured a number of sessions, out of which emerged at least two photographs, 'one very familiar, hatless, and one

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