Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

By R. C. Terry | Go to book overview

E

Eames, John, energetic, impetuous son of Mrs Eames, widow of Squire Christopher Dale's most intimate friend. Eternally rebuffed by Lily Dale, Johnny becomes a clerk in the Income Tax Office, and spends the period of his hobbledehoydom rising in wealth and career, becoming Lord De Guest's friend and Sir Raffle Buffle's private secretary. He also thrashes Adolphus Crosbie for jilting Lily and flirts with Amelia Roper. In The Last Chronicle of Barset, having inherited money from Lord De Guest, he continues his luckless pursuit of Lily while amusing himself with Madalina Demolines and travelling to Europe to find Mrs Arabin, key to the Josiah Crawley affair. SHA NCS

Eames, Mrs, widow befriended by Squire Dale and doting mother of John Eames and his sister Mary. SHA RCT

Eardham, Augusta (Gus), the second daughter of Sir George Eardham of Brayboro' Park, 'Certainly a fine girl . . . [but who] . . . would have no money' (LII). Thanks to the calculating manœuvres of her mother she marries Ralph, the heir, and becomes mistress of Newton Priory. RH ALS

Eardham, Sir George, a Berkshire baronet, the owner of Brayboro' Park and of a mansion in Cavendish Square. He is the father of Marmaduke and of three dowerless daughters, the second of whom, Augusta, marries Ralph, the heir. 'A stout, plethoric gentleman, with a short temper and many troubles' (LV). RH ALS

Eardham, Lady, wife of Sir George, characterized by Ralph Newton (the heir) as 'an interfering old fool' and 'the old harridan' (LV). Arranges the marriage of Ralph and her daughter Augusta (Gus). RH ALS

Earlybird, Earl of, obscure Earl whom the Duke of Omnium, as Prime Minister, makes a Knight of the Garter, much to the disgust of parliamentary society. Though Lord Earlybird is an acknowledged philanthropist, it is agreed that the honour of a Garter is thrown away upon him. PM JMR

'Eastern Question, On the' (speech at the 'St James's Hall Conference'). England should consider present Turkey as a wayward relative, already given extra chances. Its barbaric behaviour precludes more extra chances. Our agreements were with the previous ruler. If the Turk is to live in Europe, he must adopt the customs and behaviour of civilized men. The Times ( 9 December 1876), 7-8. AKL

Easyman, Dr, personal physician to Martha (Dunstable) Thorne. FP, DT NCS Échanbroignes, home of the Stein family and refuge for Mme and Marie de Lescure after Clisson is destroyed. LV GRH

Edgeworth, Maria ( 1767-1849), Irish novelist renowned for Castle Rackrent ( 1800), the first regional novel in English. Fanny Milton gave her future husband Thomas Trollope a copy of Edgeworth's The Modern Griselda ( 1805), which deals with the nature of marriage. The following morning, Thomas wrote from his chambers that he could not put it down. Anthony Trollope was well read in Irish fiction and admired Edgeworth's, although in Is He Popenjoy? her novels were sickening to his heroine Mary Lovelace (XLV). He paid tribute in his first novel, The Macdermots of Ballycloran, having the Dublin coach pass through Edgeworthstown, the guard referring to the residence 'of the authoress of whom Ireland may well be so proud' (appendix, World's Classics edn., 642). The John Bull ( May 1847) review of The Macdermots noted: 'events are made to bring out all the peculiar features of Irish life among the peasantry, with a fidelity of description and knowledge of character equal to anything in the writings of Miss Edgeworth' ( SmalleY549). RCT

Edinburgh Review. Begun by Sydney Smith, Francis Jeffrey, Francis Horner, and Henry Brougham in 1802, it became one of the great, widely imitated quarterlies and an influential Whig organ. In long articles, contributors introduced the practice of writing an essay under the pretext of writing a review, presenting the reviewer's ideas on the subject rather than reac

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