Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

By R. C. Terry | Go to book overview

J

Jack, Sarah. Aunt to Maurice Cumming and Marian Leslie, she helps to bring about their marriage by her force of character, determination, and generosity. "'Jack'" TAC1 GRH

Jacko, nomadic character of unspecified origins, possibly Aboriginal, attached to Gangoil as a tracker. Aged 16, he is marked by 'that wild look which falls upon those who wander about the Australian plains' (I), but is implicitly trusted by Heathcote. A minor character, Jacko nevertheless performs a pivotal role in shaping Harry's judgements and actions. Moreover, when a fire threatens Gangoil, Heathcote's trust is rewarded by Jacko labouring intensely to extinguish it. HHG MRS

Jacobi, Ruth. Oppressed by her grandfather's gloomy house and her uncle's scoldings, she longs for gaiety with a young husband before settling into domesticity. Orphaned and lonely, she is befriended by Nina Balatka, whom she finds romantically exotic, and by Rebecca Loth, whose brother Samuel would (according to her guardians) be a suitable match. It is she who brings the two women together. NB AWJ

Jacquêtanàpe, Victoire. He marries Clementina Golightly for her fortune. Victoire is a 'well- made, shining, jaunty little Frenchman' who 'was one of those butterfly beings who seem to have been created that they may flutter about from flower to flower' (XXV). TC MT

Jamaica, magnificent scenery amidst which the Leslies live under the Blue Mountain peak, but 'in its decadence' with the labour problems, caused by emancipation, for plantations like Maurice Cumming's Mount Pleasant. "'Jack'" TAC1 GRH

James, George Payne Rainsford ( 1799-1860), consul-general at Venice ( 1856-60); historical novelist, best known for Richelieu ( 1829). His production-line methods yielded three novels annually for some twenty years; he was parodied by Thackeray in Punch ( 1847). In his Commonplace Book, Trollope noted of James Corse de Leon, or the Brigand: 'I trust this will be [the] last of the modern adventurous class of novels I shall be tempted to read--for nothing gives me so great an idea of wasting my time--no not even idleness and castle building--It appears to me, that no talent--no industry--no energy was put to this work--that it consists of an improbable string of adventures very badly put forth in bad writing, and without any single charm, but that to me very poor one--the desire to know what becomes of the people' ( Letters 2, 1023). RCT

James, Henry ( 1843-1916), American novelist who settled in England ( 1875), master of subtly organized novels like Portrait of a Lady ( 1881) and The Golden Bowl ( 1904). Prior to his own success James wrote four reviews of Trollope's fiction in the New York Nation. The first, on Miss Mackenzie ( 1865), patronized Trollope for describing the obvious. 'Life is vulgar, but we know not how vulgar it is till we see it set down in his pages' ( July 1865). Can You Forgive Her? prompted a facetious parody of its title ( Nation, September 1865). James was then 21. Some fourteen years later with four novels behind him he was praised by one English reviewer but 'compared with Mr Trollope almost a tyro'. James found The Belton Estate ( 1866) 'as flat as a Dutch landscape . . . Mr Trollope is a good observer; but he is literally nothing else' ( January 1866). By the time Nina Balatka and Linda Tressel appeared anonymously, James had no trouble identifying the author. James's attitude was changing, however. 'These short novels are rich with their own intrinsic merits . . . they contain more of the real substance of common life and more natural energy of conception than any of the clever novels now begotten on our much-tried English speech' ( June 1868). When both were on board the SS Bothnia in the autumn Of 1875, James found Trollope 'the dullest Briton of them all' with 'a gross and repulsive face and manner' ( Henry James: Letters, ed. Leon Edel, 1 ( 1974), 486). Later he judged him 'a very good, genial, ordinary

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Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • For Kathleen Tillotson v
  • Preface vii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ix
  • Contents xi
  • HOW TO USE THIS BOOK xii
  • THEMATIC OVERVIEW xiii
  • CONTRIBUTORS xix
  • LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS xxiii
  • J 1
  • B 31
  • C 77
  • D 142
  • E 170
  • F 194
  • G 214
  • H 233
  • I 268
  • J 275
  • K 285
  • L 296
  • M 342
  • N 386
  • O 399
  • P 412
  • Q 455
  • R 456
  • S 474
  • T 514
  • U 562
  • V 565
  • W 570
  • CHRONOLOGY 599
  • FAMILY TREES 607
  • MAPS 622
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY 623
  • PICTURE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 625
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