Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

By R. C. Terry | Go to book overview

L

Lacordaire, M. de, middle-aged suitor of Fanny Thompson, attentive, courteous, soft. He proposes to her with trepidation because he is 'tailleur'. "'Polignac'" TAC1 GRH

"'Ladies in the Hunting Field'" (letter). The fears expressed by 'Paterfamilias' regarding ladies hunting are groundless. Good exercise, the excitement of a hard run, and occasional failing are the truths of hunting. Bloody accidents and improper behaviour are extremely rare. Pall Mall Gazette ( 28 February 1865), 3. AKL

Lady Anna (see opposite)

"'Lady of Launay, The'", first serialized in Light, 6 April 1878 to 11 May 1878 (reprinted in WFF). Bessy Pryor, a penniless orphan, has been brought up as a daughter of the household by Mrs Miles, mistress of Launay Park. Her foster- brother Philip Miles, the future heir to the Launay property, falls in love with Bessy. Mrs Miles, after trying to arrange a marriage between her ward and the Revd Alexander Morrison, 'banishes' Bessy to a friend's household in Normandy. Finally, the good-hearted old woman overcomes her snobbish objections and consents to the match. Bessy becomes Lady of Launay apparent. JS

Lafayette, Marie-Joseph, marquis de ( 1757-1834), French statesman whose contributions to liberty in America and France earned him the title of 'hero of two worlds'. He served the American cause after the Declaration of Independence, urged moderation after the French Revolution, and supported freedom movements wherever they occurred. Mrs Trollope and her husband met this charismatic figure through Fanny Wright in 1823. Lafayette invited the Trollopes to his country estate, La Grange, where, as Mrs Trollope noted in her journal, they were royally entertained. Lafayette dined with them at their farewell dinner given by Wright in Paris in 1824. Of Lafayette, Mrs Trollope wrote: 'Never did I meet with a being so every way perfect' ( Hall21). When Mrs Trollope embarked on the disastrous scheme hatched by Fanny Wright for the Nashoba commune in Tennessee, Lafayette marvelled 'at the determination of a London lady to make herself a forest pioneer' ( Mullen49). However, with the publication of Domestic Manners of the Americans ( 1832), relations with the General deteriorated. Her son's one historical novel, La Vendée, included Lafayette. Trollope drew on his mother's manuscript ( Trollope MS, University of Illinois). RCT

Lahinch, village at the southern end of Liscannor Bay where Fred Neville keeps the canoe in which he 'adventures' along the Clare coast. EE AWJ

"'La Mère Bauche'", first published in Tales of All Countries: First Series. Bauche, stern proprietor of a hotel in the French Pyrenees village of Vernet, is affronted when her favourite son Adolphe falls in love with a charity girl whom she has taken in, Marie Calvert. Adolphe is sent away and Mme Bauche arranges a 'suitable' marriage between Marie and Theodore Campan, known as 'le Capitaine'. Campan is ancient, unappealing, and has a wooden leg. Adolphe returns. It is clear he no longer loves her enough to defy his mother, and Marie throws herself from a cliff to her death. JS

landed gentry, old. Trollope's treatment of the landed gentry, while often critical, tends to be sympathetic. His affectionately satirical portrait of the Thornes of Ullathorne, for instance, is warm towards the Thornes themselves, even though it pokes fun at their 'Anglo-Saxon attitudes' ( BT XXII). However, one should be mindful of the distinction, in Trollope's earlier fiction at least, between Saxon and Norman ancestry. Trollope, as with many novelists writing in the wake of Sir Walter Scott, has more satirical fun at the expense of the old Norman families than he does with good Anglo-Saxon stock. Hence, in Barchester Towers, his satirical gibes at Lady De Courcy are more pointed than those at the Thornes; the De Courcy family is again mocked throughout Doctor Thorne and The Small House at Allington. Nevertheless, the Barset novels as a

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Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • For Kathleen Tillotson v
  • Preface vii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ix
  • Contents xi
  • HOW TO USE THIS BOOK xii
  • THEMATIC OVERVIEW xiii
  • CONTRIBUTORS xix
  • LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS xxiii
  • J 1
  • B 31
  • C 77
  • D 142
  • E 170
  • F 194
  • G 214
  • H 233
  • I 268
  • J 275
  • K 285
  • L 296
  • M 342
  • N 386
  • O 399
  • P 412
  • Q 455
  • R 456
  • S 474
  • T 514
  • U 562
  • V 565
  • W 570
  • CHRONOLOGY 599
  • FAMILY TREES 607
  • MAPS 622
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY 623
  • PICTURE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 625
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