Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

By R. C. Terry | Go to book overview

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obituaries of Trollope. From the time of Trollope's seizure on 3 November 1882 until his death on 6 December, The Times issued thirteen bulletins on his condition. When the end came tributes appeared in all the major newspapers and periodicals testifying to the immense public regard in which he was held. The Times itself, true to its perceived role as the paper of record, was muted in its estimate of his place in literature, although Mrs Humphry Ward, in an anonymous contribution commented, 'He has enriched our English fiction with characters destined to survive.' Richard Littledale in the Academy called him 'the most representative figure of contemporary literature and one who had achieved the rare distinction of having become an object of personal goodwill to uncounted readers'. 'No one', said Viscount Bryce, in the Nation, was 'so representative of English fiction both by his books and by his personality'. The Edinburgh Review called him 'capable, indefatigable, and conscientious', while the Graphic praised him for I wholesome and innocent mental pleasure'. The Athenaeum thought he was at his best in 'kindly ridicule of the approved superficialities of life'. The Saturday Review, often hostile to his novels, praised his 'instinctive revelation of life which delighted the most fastidious critic'. From the Spectator came the assertion that 'probably no English writer of his day has amused Englishmen so much as Mr Trollope, or has given them that amusement from sources so completely free from either morbid weaknesses or mischievous and dangerous taints'. In the Dublin Review he was praised for giving 'more innocent amusement and entertainment than any other writer of this generation'. Macmillan's Magazine judged 'his worst work . . . better than a great many people's best', and Blackwood's Magazine summed up a majority opinion saying, 'he was in all things, in thought and deed, the high-minded English gentleman he delighted to portray. (See R. C. Terry , Anthony Trollope ( 1977), 50-1, 269.) From abroad there were similar tributes, notably in Harper's Weekly and Princeton Review. Rome newspapers also ran notices. Among the best articles were those of R. H. Hutton ( Spectator), Walter Herries Pollock ( Harper's New Monthly), Cuthbert Bede ( Graphic), the Saturday Review, and Revd H. D. Gordon ( Guardian). A further spate of tributes, mingled with some shock, attended publication of An Autobiography one year later. RCT

O'Brien, Charles, young Irish sculptor attracted to Arabella Talboys. He asks her to elope to Naples, having taken her daring statements at face value. "'Talboys'" TAC2 GRH

O'Callaghan, Mr, evangelical clergyman at Littlebath who, though 'always hot in argument against the devil and his works', condescends to join the ladies' card games under the mellowing influence of tea and muffins. B MRS

O'Connell, Daniel ( 1775-1847), Irish patriot known as the "'Liberator'"; elected MP for Co. Clare ( 1828); founded the Repeal Association ( 1840); indicted and tried in Dublin ( 1844). His trial provided Trollope with the opening scene for his second novel The Kellys and the O'Kellys. The novel ends with a wedding in the summer of 1844, after the verdict of the packed jury had been reached ( Super49). Despite friendship with ardent supporters of O'Connell such as Charles *Bianconi, mayor of Clonmel, and William Smith O'Brien, MP for Co. Limerick, Trollope doubted the extent of Irish disaffection and believed O'Connell was its major provocateur.

RCT

O'Conor, Tom, fox-hunting father of five. Temporary host to Archibald Green, he enjoys the comedy of Larry's ineptitude at dinner. "'O'Conors'" TAC1 GRH

O'Conor family. Large and lively Irish hunting family, with three teasing daughters, Fanny, Kate, and Eliza, all of whom are highly entertained by Archibald Green's trouble with his footwear. "'O'Conors'" TAC1 GRH

"'O'Conors of Castle Conor, County Mayo, The'", first printed in Harper's New Month Magazine, May 1860 (reprinted in TACI). Trollope notes, in An Autobiography, that the story is

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