Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

By R. C. Terry | Go to book overview

S

Sabbatarianism. Deriving its authority from the Lord's Day Observance Act in the previous century, this strict code of religiously sanctioned behaviour was a focus of national debate during the Victorian period. In Barchester Towers the battle between the evangelicals and the high- church party includes the new 'Sabbath schools' and the abolition of both Sunday train services and letter deliveries, the proposed curtailment of which is vehemently opposed by Archdeacon Grantly in The Last Chronicle of Barset.

Trollope hated evangelical cant about the 'sabbath', and, as he makes clear in The New Zealander, regarded Sunday as a source of individual comfort. Trollope himself occasionally used the day for writing, and he found repellent the idea of even devout worshippers being denied the simple pleasures of reading, music, or letter- writing by small groups of religious bigots.

His experience of evangelicalism in Cheltenham, where the vicar had sought to suspend the Sunday post, is employed in the similarly restrictive society of Littlebath in Miss Mackenzie. Another example of sabbath observance occurs in Phineas Finn, in the gloomy household of the Scottish Calvinist Robert Kennedy, Lady Laura's husband, who frowns on her desire to read a novel. GH

Sadleir, John ( 1814-56), notorious banker who dealt fraudulently in railway shares and other swindles; elected MP ( 1847, 1853); committed suicide in February 1856. Trollope cited Sadleir in The New Zealander and The Three Clerks as a symbol of the way dishonesty in commercial enterprise was spreading into public life, and the danger of people becoming desensitized to it. That theme, announced in his early fiction, has its most trenchant statement in The Way We Live Now. Sadleir was one source for Melmotte. RCT

Sadleir, Michael ( 1888-1957), novelist, bibliographer, whose Excursions in Victorian Bibliography ( 1922) blazed a trail in studies of Victorian writers. His Trollope. A Commentary ( 1927) and Trollope. A Bibliography ( 1928) pioneered serious study of the novelist and his works. Sadleir best-known novel was Fanny by Gaslight ( 1940). RCT

"'St Albans Raiders, The'" (article). Canada's decision to refuse the extradition of the men who ravaged St Albans, Vermont, and fled across the border violates both treaty and common sense. The argument that the raiders were Confederate soldiers at war is not supported by the evidence. Pall Mall Gazette ( 17 June 1865), 10-11. AKL

St Bungay, Duchess of, spoiled and oversensitive wife of the Duke of St Bungay. The Duchess is not very clever and is apt to become an object of ridicule for quicker-witted ladies. Deeply resenting the fun had at her expense, she insists that her great husband protect her from such indignities. CYFH JMR

St Bungay, Duke of, one of the principal political characters of the Palliser novels. Though he holds offices in various parliamentary ministries in the Palliser novels, the Duke's 'behind the scenes' activities as architect of Liberal ministries and counsellor to Liberal prime ministers are more important than any official position. Most significant, perhaps, is the Duke's role as friend and mentor to the young Duke of Omnium, to whom he first offers the position of Chancellor of the Exchequer (in CYFH). This role becomes more challenging, however, in The Prime Minister, where he attempts to support and encourage his friend, despite misgivings that the young Duke is simply too thin-skinned to be Prime Minister. PF, ED, PR, DC. JMR

St Cuthbert's, tiny Barchester parish whose singular Gothic church is no bigger than an ordinary room. Septimus Harding becomes its rector. W NCS

St Cuthbert's, one of the grandest boys' schools in England. Harry Clavering teaches there briefly, having been chosen from a field of 100 candidates. C PJT

St Diddulph's-in-the-East, poor parish in the east end of London, overseen by Revd Outhouse

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Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • For Kathleen Tillotson v
  • Preface vii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ix
  • Contents xi
  • HOW TO USE THIS BOOK xii
  • THEMATIC OVERVIEW xiii
  • CONTRIBUTORS xix
  • LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS xxiii
  • J 1
  • B 31
  • C 77
  • D 142
  • E 170
  • F 194
  • G 214
  • H 233
  • I 268
  • J 275
  • K 285
  • L 296
  • M 342
  • N 386
  • O 399
  • P 412
  • Q 455
  • R 456
  • S 474
  • T 514
  • U 562
  • V 565
  • W 570
  • CHRONOLOGY 599
  • FAMILY TREES 607
  • MAPS 622
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY 623
  • PICTURE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 625
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