Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

By R. C. Terry | Go to book overview

V

Valcarm, Ludovic. He has an unsavoury reputation in Nuremberg for fast living and subversive politics. He moves in and out of prison as audaciously as he invades the red house: a romantic and dangerous threat to Linda's inexperienced heart. Though he persuades her to flee to Augsburg, he scarcely notices her physical and moral discomfort. When he again pursues 'his queen', she has learned her lesson. LT AWJ

Vancouver's Island. Ralph Forrest plans to travel by steamboat via the Isthmus of Panama to this most western part of Canada. "'Panama'" LS

RCT

Van Siever, Clara, handsome 25-year-old daughter of Mrs Van Siever. Her strong features, independent manner, and lack of feminine softness lead the artist Conway Dalrymple to paint her as Jael, though he later falls in love with her. LCB NCS

Van Siever, Mrs, rich widow of a Dutch merchant, mother of Clara, and partner of Augustus Musselboro and Dobbs Broughton in a money- lending business. Thin but wiry, with long false curls, she dominates and terrorizes her acquaintances with her single-minded devotion to money. LCB NCS

Vavasor, Alice. Tormented by the idea that her fiancé John Grey is too good to become her husband, she jilts Grey and agrees to marry her ungentlemanly cousin George Vavasor. As Alice fends off the various attacks that result from this switch, she shows her mettle; she is strong, virtuous, and uncommonly wilful for a Victorian woman. CYFH JMR

Vavasor, George, dastardly cousin of Alice Vavasor, whose object is purely mercenary when he tempts her into an engagement. Having attacked and killed a burglar in his youth, George is left with an unsightly 'cicatrice' which reddens angrily when he is enraged. This scar, and the violence which begot it, serve as indicators of George's true nature which is ruthlessly selfish and abusive. This is illustrated in the violent way he treats Alice and his sister Kate, in his fantasies of murdering his grandfather, and in his assaults on John Grey. CYFH JMR

Vavasor, John, Alice Vavasor's father, who has a government sinecure and spends time at his club, selfishly refusing to be a real father and companion to his daughter. Though his responsibilities are minimal, Mr Vavasor feels smothered both by his professional and his parental obligations. CYFH JMR

Vavasor, Kate, doting sister of George Vavasor who betrays her cousin Alice in an effort to promote a marriage between her and George. Appearing to act out of love, Kate is a hypocritical schemer, with cynical views on love and fidelity. When family property is left to her rather than George, he pushes her down and breaks her arm. CYFH JMR

Vavasor, Squire, father of John Vavasor and grandfather of Alice, George, and Kate. The squire, who has a bitter temper and a suspicious nature, quarrels with George, his heir, when George seeks to borrow money against the old man's property. The quarrel grows until George wishes only for the squire's death. CYFH JMR

Vavasor Hall, family residence of the Vavasors, occupied by Squire Vavasor. The small, old- fashioned house is set among the fells where Alice and Kate Vavasor love to walk, but both the Hall and the surrounding land are hateful to the heir apparent, George Vavasor. CYFH JMR

Venice, during the occupation by Austria ( 1815-66) the site of friction between locals and Austrian regiments. "'Venice'" LS GRH

Vernet, French village noted for its hot springs where la Mère Bauche has her inn. "'Bauche'" TAC1

RCT

Vicar of Bullhampton, The (see next page)

Vienna, capital of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy, where Herr Crippel plays violin in the Volksgarten. "'Schmidt'" LS GRH

Vigil, Whip, Tory MP, party whip, and member of the Parliamentary Committee on the (cont. on page 568)

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Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • For Kathleen Tillotson v
  • Preface vii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ix
  • Contents xi
  • HOW TO USE THIS BOOK xii
  • THEMATIC OVERVIEW xiii
  • CONTRIBUTORS xix
  • LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS xxiii
  • J 1
  • B 31
  • C 77
  • D 142
  • E 170
  • F 194
  • G 214
  • H 233
  • I 268
  • J 275
  • K 285
  • L 296
  • M 342
  • N 386
  • O 399
  • P 412
  • Q 455
  • R 456
  • S 474
  • T 514
  • U 562
  • V 565
  • W 570
  • CHRONOLOGY 599
  • FAMILY TREES 607
  • MAPS 622
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY 623
  • PICTURE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 625
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