Sherlock Holmes: Selected Stories

By Arthur Conan Doyle ; S. C. Roberts | Go to book overview

The Speckled Band

IN glancing over my notes of the seventy odd cases in which I have during the last eight years studied the methods of my friend Sherlock Holmes, I find many tragic, some comic, a large number merely strange, but none commonplace; for, working as he did rather for the love of his art than for the acquirement of wealth, he refused to associate himself with any investigation which did not tend towards the unusual, and even the fantastic. Of all these varied cases, however, I cannot recall any which presented more singular features than that which was associated with the well-known Surrey family of the Roylotts of Stoke Moran. The events in question occurred in the early days of my association with Holmes, when we were sharing rooms as bachelors, in Baker Street. It is possible that I might have placed them upon record before, but a promise of secrecy was made at the time, from which I have only been freed during the last month by the untimely death of the lady to whom the pledge was given. It is perhaps as well that the facts should now come to light, for I have reasons to know there are widespread rumours as to the death of Dr. Grimesby Roylott which tend to make the matter even more terrible than the truth.

It was early in April, in the year '83, that I woke one morning to find Sherlock Holmes standing, fully dressed, by the side of my bed. He was a late riser as a rule, and, as the clock on the mantelpiece showed me that it was only a quarter past seven, I blinked up at him in some surprise, and perhaps just a little resentment, for I was myself regular in my habits.

-34-

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Sherlock Holmes: Selected Stories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • SHERLOCK HOLMES SELECTED STORIES i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENT xxiv
  • Silver Blaze 1
  • The Speckled Band 34
  • The Sign of Four 67
  • A Scandal in Bohemia 206
  • The Naval Treaty 236
  • The Blue Carbuncle 279
  • The Greek Interpreter 305
  • The Red-Headed League 329
  • The Empty House 359
  • The Missing Three-Quarter 387
  • His Last Bow - An Epilogue of Sherlock Holmes 415
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