Sherlock Holmes: Selected Stories

By Arthur Conan Doyle ; S. C. Roberts | Go to book overview

The Blue Carbuncle

I HAD called upon my friend Sherlock Holmes upon the second morning after Christmas, with the intention of wishing him the compliments of the season. He was lounging upon the sofa in a purple dressinggown, a pipe-rack within his reach upon the right, and a pile of crumpled morning papers, evidently newly studied, near at hand. Beside the couch was a wooden chair, and on the angle of the back hung a very seedy and disreputable hard felt hat, much the worse for wear, and cracked in several places. A lens and a forceps lying upon the seat of the chair suggested that the hat had been suspended in this manner for the purpose of examination.

'You are engaged,' said I; 'perhaps I interrupt you.'

'Not at all. I am glad to have a friend with whom I can discuss my results. The matter is a perfectly trivial one' (he jerked his thumb in the direction of the old hat), 'but there are points in connection with it which are not entirely devoid of interest, and even of instruction.'

I seated myself in his arm-chair, and warmed my hands before his crackling fire, for a sharp frost had set in, and the windows were thick with the ice crystals. 'I suppose,' I remarked, 'that, homely as it looks, this thing has some deadly story linked on to it--that it is the clue which will guide you in the solution of some mystery, and the punishment of some crime.'

'No, no. No crime,' said Sherlock Holmes, laughing. 'Only one of those whimsical little incidents which will happen when you have four million human beings all jostling each other within the space of a few square

-279-

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Sherlock Holmes: Selected Stories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • SHERLOCK HOLMES SELECTED STORIES i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENT xxiv
  • Silver Blaze 1
  • The Speckled Band 34
  • The Sign of Four 67
  • A Scandal in Bohemia 206
  • The Naval Treaty 236
  • The Blue Carbuncle 279
  • The Greek Interpreter 305
  • The Red-Headed League 329
  • The Empty House 359
  • The Missing Three-Quarter 387
  • His Last Bow - An Epilogue of Sherlock Holmes 415
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