Life and Letters of Sir Thomas Wyatt

By Kenneth Muir | Go to book overview

Preface

THE last full-length life of Sir Thomas Wyatt was by G. F. Nott in his monumental edition of the poems. Since then there have been brief lives by Sir Edmund Chambers, Dr E. M. W. Tillyard, Sir Stanley Wyatt and others; but there has been no new edition of the letters, although Nott's text of these was unfortunately less accurate than that of the poems and although several new letters have come to light.

The discovery of some hitherto unknown poems by Wyatt, some of which have biographical importance, and recent books by Sergio Baldi, H. A. Mason, Ethel Seaton and Otto Hietsch, make a new assessment of Wyatt as a poet desirable; the finding and republication of his translation from Plutarch ( 1931) and, it is hoped, the present text of his letters make it possible to consider him as a fine writer of prose; and his diplomatic correspondence has considerable historical interest.

I have received generous help from numerous colleagues and friends, among whom must be mentioned Dr J. C. Ghosh, Dr G. K. Hunter, Mrs Inga-Stina Ewbank, Dr Dorothea Oschinsky, Mr H. B. Hall, Professor D. B. Quinn, Professor R. G. Austin, Dr R. G. Faithfull, Mr J. H. Lyons, Mr R. Southall, Mr R. T. Davies, Professor Christopher Brooke and Mr H. A. Mason. I am especially grateful to Dr A. R. Myers for his criticisms of the first draft of the book, to Sir Stanley Wyatt for patiently answering my questions, and to Professor Ruth Hughey, to whom my indebtedness extends over fifteen years and whose discovery of the Arundel Manuscript places all future editors in her debt. Mr Kenneth Povey, the former University Librarian, Mr A. N. Ricketts and Mr D. F. Cook have been consistently efficient and helpful.

I am indebted to the Trustees of the British Museum and to the Keeper of Public Records for permission to print letters by Wyatt

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Life and Letters of Sir Thomas Wyatt
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 282

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.