Life and Letters of Sir Thomas Wyatt

By Kenneth Muir | Go to book overview

III
Ambassador in Spain

Wyatt's son, at the early age of fifteen, had been married to Jane, the daughter of Sir William Hawte, of Bourne, in Kent. The marriage had probably taken place in the latter half of 1536 or in the early months of 1537. Wyatt, on his way to Spain, remembering the failure of his own marriage and his two imprisonments, took the opportunity of a short stay in Paris1 (where he conferred with the Ambassador there, the Bishop of Winchester) to write a letter of advice to the young bridegroom:


(1) WYATT TO HIS SON

In as mitch as now ye ar come to sume yeres of vnderstanding, and that you should gather within your self sume frame of honestye, I thought that I should not lese my labour holy if now I did something advertise you to take the suer fondations and stablisht opinions, that leadeth to honestye. And here I call not honestye that men comenly cal honestye, as reputation for riches, for authoritie, or some like thing, but that honestye that I dare well say your Grandfather (whos soule god pardon) had rather left to me then all the lands he did leaue me -- that was wisdome, gentlenes, sobrenes, disire to do good, frendlines to get the love of manye, and trougth above all the rest. A great part to haue al thes things is to desire to haue them: and altho Glorye and honest name are not the verye endes wherfor thes thinges are to be folowed, yet surly they must nedes folowe them, as light folowth fire, though it wer kindled for warmth. Out of these things the chiefest

____________________
1
Letters and Papers, XII, ( i) No. 949.

-38-

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Life and Letters of Sir Thomas Wyatt
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • I Early Life 1
  • II Wyatt and Anne Boleyn 13
  • III Ambassador in Spain 38
  • IV Ambassador in France 95
  • V Ambassador in Flanders 131
  • VI Cromwell's Fall and Wyatt's Trial 172
  • VII Lauda Finem 211
  • VIII Wyatt's Poetry 222
  • Appendix A 261
  • Appendix B 270
  • Appendix C 273
  • Bibliography 277
  • Index 279
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