Life and Letters of Sir Thomas Wyatt

By Kenneth Muir | Go to book overview

IV
Ambassador in France

Nothing is known of Wyatt's life between June and November 1539, as no letters have survived. But it may be assumed that he sailed from Lisbon soon after Tate's arrival in Spain and that he reached England before the end of the month. He reported to the King the information he had dared not entrust to a letter. Afterwards he spent some time at Allington Castle, reunited to Elizabeth Darrell, and he made some attempt to set his finances in order. It was probably at this time that he made certain alterations to the castle.

As Wyatt seemed to be on better terms with the Emperor than Henry's other diplomats, his services were soon required again. In November, Henry became alarmed by the news that the Emperor and the King of France had settled their differences and that the Emperor intended to pass through France, ostensibly to deal with troubles in the Low Countries, but, as Henry and Cromwell feared, for the purpose of frustrating the proposed marriage of Anne of Cleves with Henry. Wyatt, therefore, was dispatched to find out what was going on and to sow discord between the Emperor and Francis if the opportunity arose. Officially he was instructed to join his old enemy, Bonner, now the English Ambassador resident in France and Bishop elect of London, to seek an audience of the Emperor and congratulate him on his agreement with France, to do the same with Francis, and thereafter to remain ambassador with the Emperor in place of Tate. He was particularly ordered to note 'the words, manner of speech and countenances of the said Emperor, to the intent they may make the more perfect signification thereof to the King's Majesty as shall appertain' and similarly to note the

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Life and Letters of Sir Thomas Wyatt
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • I Early Life 1
  • II Wyatt and Anne Boleyn 13
  • III Ambassador in Spain 38
  • IV Ambassador in France 95
  • V Ambassador in Flanders 131
  • VI Cromwell's Fall and Wyatt's Trial 172
  • VII Lauda Finem 211
  • VIII Wyatt's Poetry 222
  • Appendix A 261
  • Appendix B 270
  • Appendix C 273
  • Bibliography 277
  • Index 279
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