Life and Letters of Sir Thomas Wyatt

By Kenneth Muir | Go to book overview

APPENDIX B

(The following extracts from David Lloyd State-Worthies -- ed. 1766, 1. 86-91) are unlikely to contain any accurate information about Wyatt. Lloyd seems in some places to have confused the poet with his father, e.g. when he implies that he was at the court of Henry VII -- and some of his facts are manifestly wrong, as when he states that Wyatt died on the way to take up his post as ambassador in Spain. Most of the witticisms attributed to Wyatt cannot have been spoken by him and this makes one sceptical of other statements, plausible in themselves. As Nott complains, Lloyd does not quote his sources.)

He fell out of his master Henry the Eight his favour, about the business of Queen Anna Bulein, till his industry, care, discretion and innocence freed him . . .

Cambden saith he was,

Eques auratus splendide doctus . . .

Queen Anne's favour towards him, raised this man: and his faithfulness to her ruined him . . .

Four things a man went to dine with Sir Thomas Wiat for: 1. For his generous entertainment. 2. For his free and knowing discourse of Spain and Germany; an insight in whose interest was his master-piece, studied by him as well for the exigence of that present juncture, as for his own satisfaction. 3. For his quickness in observing, his civility in entertaining, his dexterity in employing, and his readiness in encouraging every mans peculiar parts and inclinations. 4. For the notice and favour the king had for him. So ready was he to befriend worthy men, and so ready was the king to entertain his friend; that when a man was newly preferred, they said, He had been in Sir Thomas Wiat's closet. Happy is the prince that had a faithful favourite, by whom they may have access to the prince. A favourite that serves not his country so much by employing and pleasing its active members, as he secures his king, who hath no less need of counsel in reference to men, then things.

His wit pleased the king, and his wisdome served him: He could not be without his advice at the council-table, nor without his jests in his presence-chamber: where yet he observed his decorum so exactly, that his majesty could by no means win him one night to dancing; this being his grave resolution, That he who thought himself a wise man in the day-time, would not be a fool at night: otherwise none carry'd himself more handsomely, none conversed more ingeniously and freely, none discoursed more facetiously or solidly. In a word, it was his peculiar happiness, that his deportment was neither too severe for Henry the eight's time, nor too loose for Henry the seventh's; neither all honey nor all gall, but a sweet

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Life and Letters of Sir Thomas Wyatt
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • I Early Life 1
  • II Wyatt and Anne Boleyn 13
  • III Ambassador in Spain 38
  • IV Ambassador in France 95
  • V Ambassador in Flanders 131
  • VI Cromwell's Fall and Wyatt's Trial 172
  • VII Lauda Finem 211
  • VIII Wyatt's Poetry 222
  • Appendix A 261
  • Appendix B 270
  • Appendix C 273
  • Bibliography 277
  • Index 279
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