Art as Culture: An Introduction to the Anthropology of Art

By Evelyn Payne Hatcher | Go to book overview
temples, 3, 7, 15, 30
tension, 88, 102, 106, 113, 157, 206
terra cotta, 215, 218
textiles, 5, 7, 8, 10, 35, 36, 47, 48, 62-67, 80, 126, 161, 215, 223, 229
thinking, 138, see cognition
Thompson, R., 74, 81, 94, 123, 130, 183, 204-205, 206
Thornton, 215
totem poles, 25, G
tourist art, 184-186, 188-196
tourists, 242
trade, 40, 47, 88, 117, 120, 173, 182, 185, 198, 212, 214, 215
tradition, 120, 157, 167, 174, 179, 183, 187, G
transformation, 26
trends, 188-191
tribes, 3-4, 23-39, 37-39, 41, 43, 47, 188, G
Turnbull, C., 51
Turner, V., 113, 130
Tuzin, D., 105, 130, 145
universals, esthetic, 201-206
use, 12, 13, 19, G
utilitarian, G
values, 85, 90, 104, 121, 126, 128-131, 133, 137, 154, 204, 205, 206, 253
Vansina, 212
Vital Force, 44, 48, 225
Wakewakemanu, 11, 13
Wallace, A., 98, 110, 128, 177
war, 131-133
Warren, D., 137, 204
wax, 72, 78
wealth, 40, 121, 182, 198-199
weaving, 31, 39, 62-67, 105, 126, 132, 161
Wescott, J., 149
Whiteford, A., 10, 55, 81
Willett, F., 57, 153
Witherspoon, G., 14, 88, 148, 156
woodcarving, 5, 6, 10, 11, 13, 18, 23, 25, 31, 49, 69-70, 75, 90, 95, 109, 144, 187, 189, 191
woodworking, 31, 39, 44, 48, 75, 95
wool, 35
world view, 121, 147, 155, 187, see also iconology, G
wow-ipits, 101
yin/yang, 88-89, 225
Yuat river, 21

A NOTE ON THE TYPE IN THIS BOOK

The type face of the main text is a photo typesetting machine's poor imitation of tile beautiful face John Baskerville designed in 1752-4, and not the least of the distortions is the absence of ligatures. This is a common, typical failure of the technical revolution, and another is that most such machines are dedicated to an idiotic automatic justification that results in both very wide and very narrow word spacing, and even totally unnecessary letter spacing; there remain many examples of these esthetic horrors in the book. Hyphens are discouraged by this automation -- the system thinks they are letters, and they turn up in the middle of words in the middle of lines when something is "automatically" reset.

There was no bold face in Baskerville's time; it is a much later adaption. That in the running heads and two figure captions are 10 and 9 point Monotype's bold version. The tabular bits and all the larger 18, 24, 36 roman were handset in Monotype. This note is handset in the best available version of the face; it is the 8 point of the American Type Founders's Baskerville Series 15. It is a duplicate of Stephenson & Blake's casting, which in turn is Joseph Fry's version (ca. 1764) of Baskerville, and is very close to the original.

-337-

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Art as Culture: An Introduction to the Anthropology of Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Theoretical Note xi
  • About the Illustrations xiii
  • Acknowledgements xv
  • Introduction to the Second Edition xvii
  • Chapter 1 - Contexts and Comparisons: The Anthropological Approach 1
  • Further Reading 20
  • Chapter 2 - Where? The Geographical Dimension 21
  • Further Reading 54
  • Chapter 3 - How? The Technological Means 55
  • Further Reading 84
  • Chapter 4 - Who? The Psychological Perspective 85
  • Further Reading 112
  • Chapter 5 - Why? Social Contexts and Social Functions 113
  • Further Reading 134
  • Chapter 6 - "What. . . ?" Art as Communication 135
  • Further Reading 166
  • Chapter 7 - When and Whence? The Time Dimension 167
  • Further Reading 196
  • Chapter 8 - The Esthetic Mystery 197
  • Further Reading 207
  • Chapter 9 - The Global Context: The 15th Century 209
  • Chapter 10 - Globalization: The 20th Century 229
  • Ethnographic Notes and Index 255
  • Glossary with notes on various usages 287
  • Bibliography 303
  • Bibliography for Second Edition 327
  • Subject and Author Index 331
  • A NOTE ON THE TYPE IN THIS BOOK 337
  • About the Author *
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