Andrew Johnson: A Study in Courage

By Lloyd Paul Stryker | Go to book overview

III
CONGRESSMAN AND GOVERNOR

NOT long after December 4th, 1843, when Johnson took his seat as a member of the twenty-eighth Congress,1 he made his, maiden speech. He argued for the restitution of the fine imposed on General Jackson in 1814 for placing New Orleans under martial law.2 Old John Quincy Adams, the Nestor of the House, watched with approval the new Representative from Tennessee.

During his first term, Johnson took at least two strong positions: the championship of religious liberty through a defense of the Roman Catholic faith, of which of course he was anything but a communicant, and opposition to the high protection tariff of 1842.3 The latter, at least, was not calculated to endear him to the gentlemen of New England who were the chief protagonists and beneficiaries of the economic theories he assailed.

In the debates upon the Texas question, Mr. Clingman of North Carolina added to the excitement by the assertion that British gold had elected James K. Polk as President, and further charged that "had the foreign Catholics been divided in the late election, as other sects and classes generally were, Mr. Clay would have carried by a large majority the state of New York, as also the states of Pennsylvania, Louisiana and probably some others in the northwest."4

Second in intensity only to his love for Eliza McCardle and his children, was Johnson's passion for the Constitution of his country. Along with his British statesmen he had conned and pondered its pages. He had studied the writings of Madison, of Hamilton and the other founders of the Republic.5 Webster himself was not more attached to this great charter of our rights. Johnson knew its sacred guarantees among which is that bulwark of civil and religious liberty,--the first amendment: "Congress

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Andrew Johnson: A Study in Courage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 886

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.