Andrew Johnson: A Study in Courage

By Lloyd Paul Stryker | Go to book overview

XI
LINCOLN AND JOHNSON--THE UNIONIST TICKET

DURING the spring of 1864 the Unionists of Tennessee discerned, in the coming National Convention at Baltimore, a new opportunity through which to bring their state more rapidly into alignment with the Union. On May 30th a convention met at Nashville and, after recommending Lincoln's renomination, resolved that Johnson should be the vice-presidential nominee. It spoke of his "unflinching courage and patriotism," it praised his administration as military governor and declared that he had "endeared himself to all American patriots," and had "gained the entire confidence of all the loyal people of Tennessee."1 Their delegates now repaired to Baltimore--of course, Parson Brownlow was one of them.2

Before the convention met on June 7th, there had been much doubt as to Lincoln's renomination. The failure of the Union arms in the summer of 1862, the tragedy of Fredericksburg in December, the calamity of Chancellorsville in 1863 were all laid at his door. His availability as a candidate had become a matter of grave doubt among the leaders of his party.3

During this 'period the Presidential cravings of Chase had become so acute as to disturb even Lincoln's large magnanimity.4 In August, 1863, Chase wrote: "I think a man of different qualities from those the President has will be needed for the next four years. I am not anxious to be regarded as that man; and I am quite willing to leave that question to the decision of those who agree in thinking that some such man should be chosen."5

Nothing is more revealing of Lincoln's patience than his remark to John Hay two months later: "Mr. Chase makes a good secretary and I shall keep him where he is. If he becomes President, all right. I hope we may never have a worse man. I have

-118-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Andrew Johnson: A Study in Courage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 886

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.