Andrew Johnson: A Study in Courage

By Lloyd Paul Stryker | Go to book overview

XXIX
SUMNER BEGINS TALKING OF IMPEACHMENT

ABOVE the and wastes of talk, the tiring tumult of Congressional debate, there shines the glorious light of Lincoln's hope like a golden lamp hung high aloft in some black sky,--and Andrew Johnson was following the gleam. With the pertinacity of crusaders of old times, he had dedicated his heart, his soul and his great courage to the consummation of the work his predecessor had begun.

When the reading of Johnson's message had been completed, and the country had received and heartily applauded it, it seemed as though the opponents of Lincoln and of Johnson would be baffled in their work of opposition. But they were ingenious, they were prepared, they were determined, and there were circumstances ready at hand to aid them. One of these was the legislation being then enacted by the Southern states for the control of their freed slaves,--legislation designed and executed in perfect good faith and based upon a sound appraisal of the actualities of the situation, but offering golden opportunities to Stevens and his friends to distort the motives and purposes of those enacting it.

In the very center of Lincoln's reconstruction proclamation there was this sentence: "And I do further proclaim . . . that any provision which may be adopted by such state government in relation to the freed people of such state which shall recognize and declare their permanent freedom, provide for their education, and which yet may be consistent as a temporary arrangement, with their present condition as a laboring, landless and homeless class, will not be objected to by the National Executive."1 Lincoln knew the Southern white men could be trusted. The former slaveholders harbored no hatred for the negro. While the white men were away fighting, the negroes remained, caring for the

-249-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Andrew Johnson: A Study in Courage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 886

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.