Andrew Johnson: A Study in Courage

By Lloyd Paul Stryker | Go to book overview
Save to active project

LVI
IMPEACHMENT IS DEAD! LONG LIVE IMPEACHMENT

WHEN on November 21st the Representatives and Senators returned once more to Washington, Charles Sumner, of course, came with them, but Mrs. Sumner did not accompany him. After a few weeks in their Boston home in Hancock Street she had gone on to Lenox,--not to return. Less than a year of Charles Sumner had been more than adequate.1 Perhaps she had tired of his bland, complacent smile; perhaps his enthusiastic self- esteem had wearied her; perhaps she grew fatigued from hearing of his early social conquests in England.2 Or it may be that his "luxuriant platform manner,"3 his lack of any emotional qualities,4 and his pedantry had bored her. "These people forget that I am a cistern and require time to fill up,"5 he once had said,--perhaps she couldn't wait, or it may be that just the continuous observation of that humorless face that had so tempted Preston Brooks, was too much for Mrs. Sumner. Whatever the reasons were, she had had enough. Would that the United States had had a similar discernment!

And so Sumner and his fellow statesmen now returned. Were it not for the harm they wrought, one would be tempted to laugh at their complacent self-esteem and their unfounded pretensions to patriotism, philanthropy and statesmanship. "Great leaders like Sumner and Conkling," however, as Henry Adams has well written, "could not be burlesqued . . . their egotism and factiousness were no laughing matter."6

Johnson's enemies had sat all summer to fill twelve hundred octavo pages full of that which they called testimony. With tireless effort to find something with which they could besmirch and then impeach him, ninety-five witnesses had been examined.7 Once more their dragnets had been spread. Prisons were ransacked, the household of the President was investigated and his

-511-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Andrew Johnson: A Study in Courage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 886

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?