Andrew Johnson: A Study in Courage

By Lloyd Paul Stryker | Go to book overview

LXXV
JOHNSON QUIETLY AWAITS HIS FATE

JOHNSON was bearing his ordeal in silence. Lincoln's plan was gone, the support of the Supreme Court was gone, all of Lincoln's hopes for binding up the nation's wounds and for a speedy reconciliation,--all these were gone! Now in a few days would Lincoln's follower be humbled in the dust? Humbled because he had followed Lincoln! Over the name of the seventeenth President was there presently to be written: "Convicted of high crimes and misdemeanors and removed from office?" After all the gallant years in Tennessee, after all the dauntless days in the Senate of the United States, after all his iron espousal of the cause of justice, was his reward to be conviction and removal?

What must have been Johnson's thoughts as he observed the High Court of Impeachment at its work! The long and sorry farce with its struggling actors clad in the ill-fitting simulacra of judicial fairness! If bitterness and anger seethed within his mind, it was not revealed. His family in the White House saw him go about his daily tasks, as the trial dragged on, serene and apparently oblivious to the infamy that was enacting.1

Seldom has the White House been so alive with children as in Johnson's time. He had with him there in addition to his grown son, Col. Robert Johnson, a younger son, Andrew Johnson, Jr., then thirteen, his daughter, Mrs. Daniel Stover, with her two daughters, Sarah and Lillie, and her son, Andrew Johnson Stover. Mrs. Patterson, the President's other daughter, the accomplished mistress of the White House, had with her two children, Mary Belle and Andrew Johnson Patterson.2 Through all the storms that raged about him, Johnson had the heating solace that flows from children's laughter.3 He loved children;

-672-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Andrew Johnson: A Study in Courage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 886

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.