Andrew Johnson: A Study in Courage

By Lloyd Paul Stryker | Go to book overview

LXXXI
THE REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CONVENTION

BUT impeachment was not over. The hard-bitted enemies of Lincoln and of Lincoln's follower had still ten articles to vote upon. What they wanted now, however, was more time. Time and further opportunity to dragoon the seven Senators! Chase ruled that the balloting must continue, but he was overruled and an adjournment was taken until Tuesday, the 26th.1 The Republican National Convention was to meet in Chicago on the 20th. There, it was hoped, such enthusiasm could be engendered as to stimulate the judges of the High Court when next they met! New pressure could thus be brought to bear! Therefore, on to Chicago!

"Well!" wrote Greeley two days after the adjournment, "Mr. Johnson remains in the White House. The 11th was deliberately, and we doubt not judiciously, selected as the article that would command the most votes. This failing, all fails."2 He was voicing the disappointment of the partisans over their defeat. But hope lingered still. Through group malice, perhaps the inflamed delegates might heap such contumely on the name of Andrew Johnson that when the adjourn day came, one or more of the seven Republican Senators would no longer dare to play the man.

The nomination of Ulysses Grant was a foregone conclusion. The Convention lasted but two days. Conspicuous among the delegates were Joseph Hawley of Connecticut, General Sickles, Lyman Tremaine and Chauncey M. Depew of New York, John Bingham of Ohio, ex-Attorney-General Speed of Kentucky, Carl Schurz of Missouri and John Logan of Illinois.3

Hawley was made President of the Convention, and then the platform makers went to work. On the second day the result

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