Let This Life Speak: The Legacy of Henry Joel Cadbury

By Margaret Hope Bacon | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Henry Cadbury was a beloved and central figure in three major communities: New Testament scholarship, Quaker history, and social activism. Men and women from each of these communities, and on both sides of the Atlantic, have contributed with heartwarming eagerness to my task of assembling the telling episodes in his life. In many ways I think of myself less as the author of the book than the channel through which Henry Cadbury's many friends have pooled their memories to bring his story to life.

To thank everyone who wrote me a letter, granted me an interview, found a picture or a pamphlet, or told me yet another wonderful Henry or Lydia Cadbury story is impossible in the space I have. In the bibliography I have listed many persons who contributed to this book, whether or not their words are quoted. There are doubtless others I should have mentioned.

I would have been both unable and unwilling to write the book without the cooperation, encouragement and assistance of Henry Cadbury's relatives. Mary Hoxie Jones, his niece, and Elizabeth Musgrave, his oldest daughter, were with me on every step of the journey. Another daughter, Winifred Beer, helped to furnish pictures, and to read a draft of the manuscript with a careful eye. His sons, Christopher and Warder, and their wives, Mary and Julia, were also very helpful and supportive. His nephews Bartram and John Cadbury, and John's wife, Elizabeth; and his cousin Leah Cadbury Furtmuller, added much.

I must thank Edwin Bronner of the Haverford College Library for reading and criticizing an early draft of the manuscript, and his entire staff for their endless and courteous responses to my needs. I did most of the work on this manuscript in the Quaker Collection,

-ix-

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