Let This Life Speak: The Legacy of Henry Joel Cadbury

By Margaret Hope Bacon | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER 13
A Green Old Age

At the meetings of the Society of Biblical Literature in December of 1963, a former student, Henry Clay Niles, gave a talk called "Wit and Wisdom of Henry Joel Cadbury" in honor of Henry Cadbury's eightieth birthday on the first of the month. Henry Cadbury, looking more puckish than ever as he aged, with his long, pointed ears, small body, and bandy legs, sat in the front row so he could hear the speech, which was drawn almost entirely from his own writings. Niles remembered that Henry Cadbury had often repeated to his students the New Testament adage that a disciple is not above his teacher. But if Henry Cadbury had heard all his own witticisms before, the other assembled scholars had not, and the room was filled with laughter.1

Among his colleagues, Henry Cadbury was known not only for his wit and scholarship but also for his forthrightness. Julius Seelye Bixler had been his colleague at Harvard for many years. Once he gave him a chapter of a forthcoming book for comment. In returning it, Henry Cadbury said, "I didn't expect to like it, but I think it is quite good." Remembering this, Bixler wrote, "Afterwards I thought: how like Henry! Honest to a fault, and yet considerate and eager to be encouraging; shunning fulsomeness like the plague itself, yet not wanting to downplay friendliness." With several other older scholars, Henry Cadbury always sat in the front row at the meetings of the Society of Biblical Literature, William Beardslee now recalls. "Frequently, after one of the younger scholars gave a paper he would ask a question that would probe the weak points of the presentation and lead to a vigorous discussion.... His astringent honesty and integrity were memorable."2

-196-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Let This Life Speak: The Legacy of Henry Joel Cadbury
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 258

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.