Economic and Social History of Chowan County, North Carolina, 1880-1915

By Mabel Newcomer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
THE MOVEMENT TOWARD SEPARATION IN THE UNITED STATES AS A WHOLE

THE states thus far considered are those which have carried separation so far that it has become a distinctive feature of their systems;1 but separation exists in so many forms and in such varying degrees in the United States that a complete account would involve some description of the revenue systems of every state. A detailed examination is unnecessary for purposes of this study, but it is important to consider certain phases of the subject with reference to more of the states than, have thus far been discussed.

To begin with, the question whether the tendency toward separation is increasing can be answered only by observing the trend in all of the states. The fact that of those states which have carried separation farthest, Connecticut, New York and Vermont have apparently abandoned it permanently in its complete form, and that California is maintaining it only with difficulty, would suggest that the move

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1
Virginia, of which no special account has been given attained partial separation in 1915. This was made possible by the provision of the new constitution, adopted in 1902, which permits classification for taxation after 1912. Real estate and tangible personalty is subject to local taxation only, except for a 10-cent school tax. Intangible personalty except money, is subject to a state tax of 65 cents per $100. Counties may add as much as 35 cents per $100 to this tax. ( New York Tax Reform Association Bulletin, no. 560, p. 8.) Since separation is only partial, and since it has been accomplished too recently for its effects to be apparent, it would not be worth while to give it special consideration.

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