A Collection of English Poems, 1660-1800

By Ronald S. Crane | Go to book overview

I could give thee thousand Kisses,

Hoping what I most desire: 55
Not a Mother's fondest Wishes,
Can to greater Joys aspire.


THOMAS TICKELL
(1686-1706-1740)

To the Earl of Warwick
On the Death of Mr. Addison1

IF, DUMB too long, the drooping Muse hath stay'd,
And left her debt to Addison unpaid;
Blame not her silence, Warwick, but bemoan,
And judge, oh judge, my bosom by your own.

What mourner ever felt poetic fires! 5
Slow comes the verse, that real woe inspires:
Grief unaffected suits but ill with art,
Or flowing numbers with a bleeding heart.

Can I forget the dismal night, that gave
My soul's best part for-ever to the grave! 10
How silent did his old companions tread,
By mid-night lamps, the mansions of the dead,
Through breathing statues, then unheeded things,
Through rowes of warriors, and through walks of kings!

What awe did the slow solemn knell inspire; 15
The pealing organ, and the pausing choir;
The duties by the lawn-rob'd prelate pay'd;
And the last words, that dust to dust convey'd!
While speechless o'er thy closing grave we bend,
Accept these tears, thou dear departed friend, 20
Oh gone for-ever, take this long adieu;
And sleep in peace, next thy lov'd Montagu!

To strew fresh laurels let the task be mine,
A frequent pilgrim, at thy sacred shrine;

Mine with true sighs thy absence to bemoan, 25
And grave with faithful epitaphs thy stone.
If e'er from me thy lov'd memorial part,
May shame afflict this alienated heart;
Of thee forgetful if I form a song,
My lyre be broken, and untun'd my tongue, 30

____________________
1
Published in Addison Works, 1721. Text of first edition.

-335-

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