A Collection of English Poems, 1660-1800

By Ronald S. Crane | Go to book overview

Sidney, what good man envies not thy blow? 245

Who wou'd not wish Anytus for a foe?
Intrepid Virtue triumphs over Fate,
The good can never be unfortunate.
And be this maxim graven in thy mind,
The height of virtue is to serve mankind. 250
But when old age has silver'd o'er thy head,
When memory fails, and all thy vigour's fled,
Then may'st thou seek the stillness of retreat,
Then hear aloof the human tempest beat,
Then will I greet thee to my woodland cave, 255
Allay the pangs of age, and smooth thy grave.


OLIVER GOLDSMITH

(1730 ?-1757-1774)

An Elegy on that Glory of her Sex, Mrs. Mary Blaize

GOOD people all, with one accord,
Lament for Madam BLAIZE,
Who never wanted a good word--
From those who spoke her praise.

The needy seldom pass'd her door, 5
And always found her kind;
She freely lent to all the poor,--
Who left a pledge behind.

She strove the neighbourhood to please,

With manners wond'rous winning, 10
And never follow'd wicked ways,--
Unless when she was sinning.

At church, in silks and sattins new,
With hoop of monstrous size,

She never slumber'd in her pew,--15
But when she shut her eyes.

Her love was sought, I do aver,
By twenty beaus and more;
The king himself has follow'd her,--

When she has walk'd before. .20

____________________
1
Published in The Bee, October 27, 1759. Text of first edition.

-834-

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