A Collection of English Poems, 1660-1800

By Ronald S. Crane | Go to book overview

And hafflins steeks them frae their daily toil:
The cruizy too can only blink and bleer,

The restit ingle's done the maist it dow; 105
Tacksman and cottar eke to bed maun steer,
Upo' the cod to clear their drumly pow,
Till wauken'd by the dawning's ruddy glow.

Peace to the husbandman and a' his tribe,

Whase care fells a' our wants frae year to year; 110
Lang may his sock and couter turn the gleyb,
And bauks o' corn bend down wi' laded ear.
May SCOTIA'S simmers ay look gay and green,
Her yellow har'sts frae scowry blasts decreed;
May a' her tenants sit fu' snug and bien, 115
Frae the hard grip of ails and poortith freed,
And a lang lasting train o' peaceful hours succeed.


RICHARD BRINSLEY SHERIDAN
( 1751-1771-1816)

Song1

IF A daughter you have, she's the plague of your life,
No peace shall you know, tho' you've buried your wife,
At twenty she mocks at the duty you taught her,
O, what a plague is an obstinate daughter.

Sighing and whining, 5
Dying and pining,
O, what a plague is an obstinate daughter.

When scarce in their teens, they have wit to perplex us,
With letters and lovers for ever they vex us,

While each still rejects the fair suitor you've brought her, 10
O, what a plague is an obstinate daughter.
Wrangling and jangling,
Flouting and pouting,
O, what a plague is an obstinate daughter.

____________________
1
Published in Songs in the Duenna, 1775. Text of The Duenna, 1794, Act I, Scene iii.

-933-

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