A Collection of English Poems, 1660-1800

By Ronald S. Crane | Go to book overview

INDEX OF FIRST LINES
A Fox may steal your Hens, Sir 381
A Milk white Hind, immortal and unchang'd 124
A Moment's patience, gentle Mistris Anne 784
A Pox of this fooling, and plotting of late 198
A Set of Phrases learn't by Rote 261
A Shepherd's Boy (he seeks no better name) 383
A Soul as full of Worth, as void of Pride 503
A Spacious Hive well stockt with Bees 316
A ye wha are sae guid yoursel 1066
Ae fond kiss, and then we sever 1077
Ah! from mine eyes the tears unbidden start 1099
Ah me! full sorely is my heart forlorn 695
Ah me, my friend! it will not, will not last! 710
Ah, stay thy treacherous hand, forbear to trace 815
Ah! what a weary race my feet have run 814
Ah! who can tell how hard it is to climb 888
Aid me Bellona, while the dreadful Fight 29
All humane things are subject to decay 96
All in the Downs the fleet was moor'd 373
All my past Life is mine no more 189
Almighty Maker God! 327
Amid the garden's fragrance laid 716
And did those feet in ancient time 1035
And now 'tis time; for their officious haste 47
Animula, vagula, blandula 210
As clever Tom Clinch, while the Rabble was bawling 260
As Doctors give physic by way of prevention 229
As once, if not with light Regard 735
As Rochefoucault his maxims drew 268
As sickly Plants betray a niggard earth 763
As some fond virgin, whom her mother's care 449
As Tom the Porter went up Ludgate-Hill557
As when some skilful cook, to please each guest 341
Asses milk, half a pint, take at seven, or before 692
At length, by so much importunity press'd 561
At Polwart on the Green531
Awake, Æolian lyre, awake 770
Awake, my St. John! leave all meaner things 460
Away to the Brook 179
Be not too proud, imperious Dame 193

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