The Aesthetics of Discontent: Politics and Reclusion in Medieval Japanese Literature

By Michele Marra | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abo, Prince, 39-40, 42
Account of My Mansion on the Pond (Chitei no Ki), 88-90
Account of People Reborn in Amida's Paradise (Nihon ōjō Gokuraku Ki), 88
Aesthetics: basara, 154; as bourgeois concept, 1, 3-5; Buddhist, 59-63, 140-142; of courtliness (miyabi), 11, 35, 48-53, 148- 152, 154; depoliticized, 1-2, 4; of madness, ii; and the Musashi girl, 107; Neo-Confucian, 2; new historicist, 5; and Politics, 4- 7; of reclusion, 91, 96-100, 154
Ariwara no Narihira (825-880): and antiFujiwara sentiments, 43-48; and birth of Prince Sadakazu, 42-43; and the Ise virgin, 109; journey of, 121; and the literature of reclusion, 35; and Minamoto no Tōru, 51; and Prince Koretaka, 11, 52-53, 91, 149, 150; and relationship with Fujiwara no Takaiko, 37-40, 114
Ariwara no Yukihira (818-893), 42, 43, 44, 45, 86, 124
Asahara Tameyori, 112
Asami Kazuhiko, 80
Ashikaga Tadayoshi ( 1306-1352), 135
Ashikaga Takauji ( 1305-1358), 134, 135
As I Crossed a Bridge of Dreams (Sarashina Nikki), 57
Awakening of Faith (Hosshihshū), 60, 61, 62, 88; examples of reclusion in, 93-96, 99
Bamboo Cutter (Taketori Monogatari): authorship of, 34; Buddhist elements in, 24-28; as meaning of taketori, 19; political implications of, 28-34; and the ritsuryō system, 33; sources, 24-25; Taoist elements in, 16-24; textual history of, 14-15
Bonmōkyō (Net of Brahma), 149
Buddhism: Amidist faith, 26, 87, 91, 92, 94; and emptiness, 66; and hongaku (original enlightenment), 144; and imperial power, 14; and literary arts, 55-59; and madness, 9, 61-62, 144; and nondifferentiation, 68- 69; and process of change, 66-67; and religious suicide, 95-96; Tachikawa sect of, 117; and theory of the Five Defilements, 72; and theory of the Five periods, 71-72; and theory of the rotation of the Four Kalpas, 72; and theory of the Three Ages, 71; and time, 140-142.
Chitei no Ki. See Account of My Mansion on the Pond
Chōken (priest) (1126-1203), 57, 78Chronicles of Japan (Nihon Shoki), 29, 73, 77
Chuang-tzu (Jap. Sōshi), 22
Collection of Selected Excerpts (Senjũshō), 61
Confucianism, 142; and Kenkō, 127, 139; and Yoshishige no Yasutane, 88-90
Contradictions: meaning of, 136
Daigo, Emperor (r. 897-930), 89
Daikakuji line, 106, 111, 112, 113, 118, 128, 129, 131, 134
de Tracy, Destutt (1754-1836), 158 n.22.
Diary of Murasaki Shikibu (Murasahi Shikibu Nikki), 57, 102
Dōga (priest) (1284-1343), 131, 178 n.40
Dōgen (1200-1253), 140, 145
Eagleton, Terry, 7, 136
Eifukumon'in, Empress, 104, 113
Eiga Monogatari. See Tale of Flowering Fortunes
Elixir of immortality, 17-18, 23, 27, 28, 34
Enseimon'in, 129
En'yũ, Emperor (r. 969-984), 61
Essays in Idleness (Tsurezuregusa): and aesthetics, 148-152; and court practices, 139, 178 n.40; date of, 178 n.29; and death, 141; and education, 145-146; and the ideal man, 143; and labor, 145; and

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